Institute of African Studies - Columbia University

Courses

African Language Courses

Fall 2017: ADVANCED WOLOF I

Call Number: 
63608
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Prerequisites: Two years of Wolof or instructor permission.

Fall 2017: ADVANCED YORUBA I

Call Number: 
13398
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
Adeolu A Ademoyo, Stephane A Charitos

Fall 2017: ADVANCED ZULU I

Call Number: 
11897
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh, Stephane A Charitos

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission. This course allows students to practice adanced structures of the Zulu language. Please note this course is offered by videoconference from Yale through the Shared Course Initiative.

Fall 2017: ARABIC FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I

Call Number: 
25399
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Youssef Nouhi

As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 2208. This is an intensive course that combines the curriculum of both First and Second Year Arabic in two semesters instead of four, and focuses on the productive skills (speaking and writing) in Modern Standard Arabic (Fusha). Students are exposed intensively to grammar and vocabulary of a high register. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to move on to Third Year Arabic. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: ELEMENTARY SWAHILI I

Call Number: 
19020
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:10am-10:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: ELEMENTARY WOLOF I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
69656
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 12:10pm-1:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: ELEMENTARY YORUBA I

Call Number: 
82529
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:00am
Instructor: 
Adeolu A Ademoyo, Stephane A Charitos

This course is designed to bring students with no background to a point where they can perform most basic linguistic functions in Yoruba, including greetings, likes/dislikes, telling about yourself, describing places and situations, all in appropriate time frames. The class uses a highly interactive classroom style, supplemented by extensive use of video – both prepared and student-produced – and other computer-assisted tools. Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.

Fall 2017: ELEMENTARY ZULU I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21107
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MWRF 11:35am-12:25pm
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh, Stephane A Charitos

Introduces students to the basic structures of Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, especially in the Zululand area of KwaZulu/Natal province.

Fall 2017: FIRST YEAR ARABIC I

Call Number: 
11815
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 4:10pm-5:15pm
Instructor: 
May Ahmar

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: FIRST YEAR ARABIC I

Section: 
003
Call Number: 
71726
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
Rym Bettaieb

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: FIRST YEAR ARABIC II

Call Number: 
77730
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Reem Faraj

Prerequisites: First Year Arabic I or instructor permission. An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: FOURTH YEAR CLASSICAL ARABIC I

Call Number: 
71150
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Prerequisites: Students should have completed Third Year Arabic Through reading excerpts from thirteen essential works, starting with Jabarti's history of the French Campaign in Egypt to a chapter from al-Qur'an, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main themes in Classical Arabic literature, acquire a sense of literary style over a period of fourteen centuries as well as literary analytical terminology and concepts. The texts are selections from essential works that the students will read in detail, write critical pieces, engage in discussion and have assignments which will expand their vocabulary, manipulation of advanced grammar concepts, and employing stylistic devices in their writing. This course will enable students to start doing research in classical Arabic sources and complements MESAAS's graduate seminar Readings in Classical Arabic. The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: FOURTH YEAR MODERN ARABIC I

Call Number: 
29773
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Prerequisites: Instructor permission. Through reading articles and essays by Arab thinkers and intellectuals, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main themes in Arab thought The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: INTERMEDIATE WOLOF I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
72308
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Further develops a student's knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: INTERMEDIATE YORUBA I

Call Number: 
92192
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:05am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Adeolu A Ademoyo, Stephane A Charitos

Prerequisites: YORU W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. In this course, learners will continue practicing all four language skills through every day dialogues, writing letters, and describing basic situations. In addition, they will be introduced to Yoruba literature and learn how to read and comprehend basic Yoruba texts, such as newspaper articles. Finally, they will be introduced to current affairs as well as social, artistic and, cultural events and issues in Nigeria. The class uses a highly interactive classroom style, supplemented by extensive use of video – both prepared and student-produced – and other computer-assisted tools. Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.

Fall 2017: INTERMEDIATE ZULU I

Call Number: 
27447
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:30am-11:20am
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh, Stephane A Charitos

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission. Provides students with an in-depth review of the essentials of the Zulu grammar. Students are also able to practice their language skills in conversation.

Fall 2017: SECOND YEAR ARABIC I

Section: 
002
Call Number: 
22276
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Rym Bettaieb

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: SECOND YEAR ARABIC I

Call Number: 
22147
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 2:40pm-3:45pm
Instructor: 
May Ahmar

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: SECOND YEAR ARABIC II

Call Number: 
12285
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 2:40pm-3:45pm
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: THIRD YEAR ARABIC I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21383
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Reem Faraj

NOTE: There are 2 sections of Third Year Arabic I. Section 001 follows the standard curriculum building all 4 language skills, as described below. Section 002 follows a reading-intensive curriculum, with less emphasis on listening and writing while still conducted in Arabic, and is intended for those preparing for advanced research in modern or classical Arabic texts. Students in the regular third-year Arabic track improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through close reading, compositions, class discussions, and presentations in Arabic on topics such as cultures of the Arab world, classical and modern Arabic literature, and contemporary Arabic media. Review of grammatical and syntactic rules as needed. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Fall 2017: THIRD YEAR ARABIC I

Section: 
002
Call Number: 
74990
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 1:10pm-2:15pm
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

NOTE: There are 2 sections of Third Year Arabic I. Section 001 follows the standard curriculum building all 4 language skills, as described below. Section 002 follows a reading-intensive curriculum, with less emphasis on listening and writing while still conducted in Arabic, and is intended for those preparing for advanced research in modern or classical Arabic texts. Students in the regular third-year Arabic track improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through close reading, compositions, class discussions, and presentations in Arabic on topics such as cultures of the Arab world, classical and modern Arabic literature, and contemporary Arabic media. Review of grammatical and syntactic rules as needed. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.


Africana Studies

Fall 2017: INTRODUCTN TO AFRICAN STUDIES

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
02457
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Abosede George

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the study of Africa, moving from pre-colonial through colonial and post-colonial periods to contemporary Africa. Focus will be on its history, societal relations, politics and the arts. The objective is to provide a critical survey of the history as well as the continuing debates in African Studies.

Fall 2017: UNHEARD VOICES: AFRICAN WOMEN

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
04111
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Yvette Christianse

How does one talk of women in Africa without thinking of Africa as a 'mythic unity'? We will consider the political, racial, social and other contexts in which African women write and are written about in the context of their located lives in Africa and in the African Diaspora.


Anthropology

Fall 2017: AFRICAN POPULAR CULTURE

Call Number: 
02644
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Brian Larkin

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor required. This course examines the political aesthetics of African cultural production and how that production provides sites from which African experiences of colonial and postcolonial life are articulated.


Art History

Fall 2017: CHE GLOBAL DIVISION OF DOCUMENTARY LABOR

Call Number: 
73146
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Trevor E Stark

This undergraduate seminar offers an introduction to the politics and aesthetics of documentary from the late 1960s to the present in photography, film, and multimedia art. Central to this course will be an analysis of how documentary is bound up with ethical questions about the right to representation and self-representation in a variety of geopolitical contexts, including Africa, the Americas, Europe, and the Middle East. Over the course of the semester, we will trace shifts in the subject of documentary representation, from the heroic industrial worker (often male and European) in early twentieth-century Factography and Worker Photography to a multiplicity of political subjectivities reflecting topics such as domestic labor, anti- and post-colonial struggles, and surveillance in our current digital world.


Contemporary Civilization and Literature Humanities

Fall 2017: AFRICAN CIVILIZATION

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
72381
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Wendell H Marsh

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*

Fall 2017: AFRICAN CIVILIZATION

Section: 
01
Call Number: 
10302
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Kai Kresse

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*


Core Curriculum (Global Core)

Fall 2017: EAST AFRICAN HISTORY

Call Number: 
26645
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century. This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Field(s): AFR


Dance

Fall 2017: AFRICAN DANCE I

Call Number: 
03372
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Concentrates on the dances of West Africa, including Senegal, Mali, and Guinea, and a variety of dances performed at various functions and ceremonies. Explanation of the origin and meaning of each dance will be an integral part of the material presented.

Fall 2017: AFRICAN DANCE I

Call Number: 
02678
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 9:30am-10:30am
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Concentrates on the dances of West Africa, including Senegal, Mali, and Guinea, and a variety of dances performed at various functions and ceremonies. Explanation of the origin and meaning of each dance will be an integral part of the material presented.

Fall 2017: AFRICAN DANCE II

Call Number: 
04932
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:30am-11:30am
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: DNCE BC2252 or permission of instructor.


English and Comparative Literature

Fall 2017: AFRICAN AMERICAN NOVELISTS AND THE QUESTION OF JUSTICE

Call Number: 
73197
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Farah Griffin

This course asks, “What conceptions of Justice emerge from a selection of works by canonical African American writers? Are there other moral/ethical/social values that emerge as more significant than Justice ?” We open with an exploration of Justice in the works of the Greek dramatist, Aeschylus, the Hebrew Bible and recent scholarship on Pre-Colonial West Africa in order to consider what concepts of Justice African-American writers have inherited or that have informed them in less formal ways. We then turn to texts by Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Ernest Gaines, James Baldwin and Toni Morrison, to examine the way these writers engage, negotiate and critique the relationship between Justice and Race in the United States.

Fall 2017: GLOBAL SOUTH ATLANTIC: Comparative Postcolonialismshttps://courseworks2.columbia.edu/courses/47739

Day/Time: 
Tues. 4:10-6:00
Instructor: 
Joseph R Slaughter

Despite the rise in oceanic, hemispheric, and regional studies in the past decade, and despite the institutional formations of Transatlantic, Black Atlantic, and Diaspora studies, the South Atlantic has not emerged as a particularly potent conceptual or analytical configuration in cultural studies. In “The Global South Atlantic,” we will examine some of the socio-historical linkages and cultural circulations among Latin America, Africa, and the Caribbean; perhaps more importantly, we will also examine both the various ideological and cultural efforts to produce a coherent political and economic image-space of the “South Atlantic” and the forces that have kept it from coming into being or capturing the imagination. “Global” in the course title not only points to the international south-south connections that would constitute a functional system of relations called the “South Atlantic”; it also recognizes that the “South Atlantic” is an imaginary that has been thought and practiced variously from multiple locations.

Our primary literary texts from and about Africa, Latin America, and the Caribbean engage periods and issues that establish and reconfigure relations among peoples around the south Atlantic: charter-company colonialism; the transatlantic slave trade and abolitionism; anti-colonialism and decolonization; tricontinentalism and the non-aligned movement; Cold War dictatorships, resource extraction, and human rights internationalism; indigenous movements and dirty wars; diasporas and exiled intellectuals; transitional justice and truth commissions; regional economic and security communities.

Fall 2017: MODERN AFRICAN DRAMA

Call Number: 
61446
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Elliot H Ross

This seminar is an introduction to writing for the theater by African dramatists, from the mid 20th Century to the present. Assigned readings are mainly major plays by canonical Anglophone writers. Primary texts are read in conversation with secondary readings which introduce major critical debates in the study of African literature and provide cultural and political context. Surveys of African literature typically center the novel. This course instead takes drama as the starting point for engaging key questions about modern African literary production. The major theme of the class is the relationship between work by African dramatists and oppressive social structures. Students are encouraged to reflect on different theories of theater as articulated by African writers. Readings are organized more or less chronologically around a series of topics. These include the lived experience of colonialism, anti-colonial thought, the emergence of new nation states, neo-colonialism, gender and sexuality, the problem of apartheid, the antiapartheid struggle, transitional justice, human rights and humanitarianism. No specific prior training or expertise in these areas is required.

Fall 2017: STAGING THE EARLY MOD MEDITERRANEAN

Call Number: 
65016
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Patricia E Grieve

This course examines, in sixteenth and seventeenth century Spain and England (1580-1640), how the two countries staged the conflict between them, and with the Ottoman Empire; that is, how both countries represent national and imperial clashes, and the concepts of being “Spanish,” “English,” or “Turk,” as well as the dynamic and fluid identities of North Africa, often played out on the high seas of the Mediterranean with Islam and the Ottoman Empire. We will consider how the Ottoman Empire depicted itself artistically through miniatures and court poetry. The course will include travel and captivity narratives from Spain, England, and the Ottoman Empire.


French Courses

Fall 2017: AFRICAN LIT & PHILOSOPHY

Call Number: 
25619
Points: 
3
Location: 
507 Philosophy Hall
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Souleymane B Diagne

Negritude: Literature and Philosophy. The movement of Negritude started in the 1930’s in Paris by African and Caribbean francophone writers was at once a literary and a philosophical project. The literature of Negritude will then be studied in this seminar as literature and as philosophy.


History Courses

Fall 2017: AFRICAN FUTURES

Call Number: 
88529
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

The premise of the course is that Africa's collective past - that which has emerged since the ending of the Atlantic slave trade - might usefully be thought of as a sequence of futures that were imperfectly realized. Those "futures past" represent once-fixed points on the temporal horizon, points toward which African political leaders and intellectuals sought to move, or towards which they were compelled by the external actors who have historically played an outsized role in the continent's affairs.

Fall 2017: Global Health in Africa

Call Number: 
72195
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Dr. Sarah Runcie

Course Description: This course will examine changing ideas of health and disease in Africa as a subject of transnational concern, debate, and cause for action in the 20th century. We will study how global health campaigns and institutions translated in specific African contexts and simultaneously how experiences of disease and medicine in African contexts shaped global concerns. This course will take both a chronological and thematic approach, providing students with an overview of changing social, political and economic conditions that have impacted understandings of disease burden and health interventions in Africa over time. Topics of study will include colonial medical campaigns, disease eradication programs, international medical research, and postcolonial health systems. We will use specific regional and national examples, while also connecting these examples to broader developments in African history. At the same time, students in this course will interrogate how ‘Africa’ has functioned as a category within global health. The final weeks of the course will consider contemporary health issues in Africa and ask how historical perspectives can inform our analysis.

Fall 2017: GRADUATE LECTURE EAST AFRICAN HISTORY

Call Number: 
88941
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

Fall 2017: HOUSEHOLD&FAMILY IN AFRICAN HISTORY

Call Number: 
29779
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
T 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

The household and family loomed large in the colonial ethnographies of Africa of the twentieth century. But in the imaginings of those anthropologists, household and family were eternal structures; they were institutions without history. Historical scholarship and later anthropologists have challenged that notion and shown that these were and are complicated and diverse social institutions with specific histories and consequences. This course puts the anthropological theories of household and family in Africa into conversation with historical scholarship on them. In so doing, we will explore questions of lineage, marriage, gender and kinship, which have often been invoked as explanatory factors in historical processes, but all of which need to be historicized themselves.


Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Fall 2017: AFRICA BEFORE COLONIALISM

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
76047
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Mamadou Diouf

Fall 2017: AFRICA: MODERNITY/POST COLONIAL EXPERIENCE

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21868
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Kai Kresse

This 4000 level seminar course is organized around weekly readings that represent substantial contributions to the debate about both 'modernity' and 'postcolonial experience' in Africa, from a range of interrelated disciplinary perspectives. In readings and discussions, we will keep the relationship between the two main discursive fields in view, and also (re-)consider the ongoing relevance of colonialism and colonial experiences in relation to them. Conceptual reflections on modernity and postcolonial experience(s) need to be based upon empirical research, and underpinned by regional socio-historical knowledge of the settings and scenarios discussed - there is no 'modernity' per se and no 'postcolonial experience' as such. We will involve comparative, historical and contemporary angles of discussion, and pursue an interest in critical conceptualization in relation to social and political realities in Africa, and with a view to African thinkers.

Fall 2017: CINEMA & SOC IN ASIA & AFRICA

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13647
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TBA
Instructor: 
Hamid Dabashi

Introduction to Middle Eastern cinema as a unique cultural product in which artistic sensibilities are mobilized to address, and thus reflect, significant aspects of contemporary society, Arab, Israeli, Turkish, and Iranian cinema. Cultural and collective expressions of some enduring concerns in modern Middle Eastern societies. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.


Other Departments

Fall 2017: CITIES IN DEVELOPING COUNTRIES

Urban Studies
Call Number: 
02941
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Sevin Yildiz

Prerequisites: Must attend first class for instructor permission. Preference to Urban Studies majors. Examination of cities in developing countries, with a focus on environment, employment, and housing. Four cases will be studied: Sao Paulo, Brazil; Johannesburg, South Africa; Bombay, India; and Shanghai, China. We will consider urbanization patterns and the attendant issues, the impact of global economic trends, and governmental and non-governmental responses.

Fall 2017: HUMAN RIGHTS OF WOMEN

Institute for the Study of Human Rights
Call Number: 
75942
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Sheila A Dauer

This course introduces students to a range of obstacles that have arisen - and continue to arise - in the struggle to make sure that women are treated as full and legitimate bearers of human rights as well as some of the significant critiques that have emerged from this struggle. The course provides a historical overview of conflicts over women's roles in family, the economy and the body politic and addresses gains women have made as well as challenges they face in relation to economic development, military conflict, domestic inequality, health, and religious and cultural beliefs. Materials provide a range of comparative views of advances and obstacles to women's rights in Latin America, Asia, Africa, Europe and the U.S. Students will also learn about significant instruments, strategies, and movements intended to remedy the inequalities that affect women.

Fall 2017: Social Movements and Education

Call Number: 
ITSF 4199
Points: 
2
Instructor: 
Sandra Sirota

This course introduces students to social movement theories and concepts, and their
application to education-related movements. Social movements are sustained collective actions
by people, often those marginalized and oppressed in society, to create lasting social and/or
political change. We will explore how historical and current social movements arise and
function, and why they succeed or fail. We will examine international education movements in
two countries – the Fees Must Fall and Rhodes Must Fall movements in South Africa and the
right to education movement in India. We will explore how contemporary movements may
embrace or reject certain frameworks, such as the human rights framework, as a tool to achieve
their goals. We will also consider recent and newly emerging movements in the United States
such as Black Lives Matter as well as intersectional activism as a fairly new frame for social
movements.
Please note this course has a special schedule:

4 sessions - 9:00am – 3:15pm
Session 1: Saturday, November 4
Session 2: Friday, November 10
Session 3: Saturday, November 11
Session 4: Friday, November 17

Fall 2017: SR SEM:INTL TOPICS URB STUDIES

Urban Studies at Barnard
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
05401
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Sevin Yildiz

Prerequisites: Senior standing. Admission by application only (available at http://urban.barnard.edu/forms-and-resources). Year-long course; participation is for two consecutive terms. No new students admitted for spring. A year-long research seminar for students who wish to conduct a senior thesis project that focuses on cities outside of the United States. Topics relating to the rapid urbanization of Latin America, Africa, and Asia are particularly welcome. Seminar meetings will include discussion of relevant readings, as well as occasional class presentations and peer-editing assignments.


Political Science

Fall 2017: COLLOQUIUM: URBAN VIOLENCE

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
06187
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Eduardo Moncada

Prerequisites: V 1501 or equivalent One of the key contemporary challenges for democracy and development across both the developing and developed worlds is urban violence. From urban gangs to paramilitaries to vigilantes to citizen defense committees, the city is increasing a key setting for a range of armed actors that engage in equally diverse forms of criminality and the exercise of coercive force. Major cities throughout the world thus lead two lives: as control and command centers in a globalized (and urbanized) economy, and as the stages where the monopoly over the legitimate use of violence that Max Weber identified as a defining attribute of the state is contested on a daily basis. This course has two overarching objectives. The first objective is to examine and critically assess existing theories of the drivers, functions, and consequences of urban crime and violence. The second objective is to situate existing research within a broader range of classic and emerging political science research on state building, institutions, democracy, development, and conflict. The methodological emphasis of the course is comparative analysis, and therefore empirical material will largely draw on analyses of crime and violence in Latin America and Africa, and the United States. This course will introduce students to the key theories, debates, and empirical studies of urban crime and violence. Students who successfully complete the class will: 1. Acquire a broad knowledge of the theories and concepts used to analyze urban crime and violence. 2. Develop a theoretically informed and empirically grounded understanding of both historical and contemporary trends in crime and violence in major cities across Latin America, Africa, and the United States. 3. Draw linkages between news coverage of urban crime and violence and political science theories on a range of broader issues regarding state building, institutions, democracy, and development. 4. Use existing theories to analyze, assess, and present empirical data, both written and verbal. 5. Produce a major, original research paper that advances existing knowledge of the origins, dynamics, and/or consequences of urban crime and violence.


SIPA Courses

Fall 2017: AFRICAN INSTITUTIONS IN A CHANGING REGIONAL AND GLOBAL SECURITY ENVIRONMENT

Location: 
IAB 402
Day/Time: 
Thursdays 11:00AM-12:50PM
Instructor: 
Professor John L. Hirsch

The course seeks to give the student the perspective and analytical capability to understand and
deal with the complex challenges facing Africa’s continental and regional institutions. In
particular, the course aims to enable you: a) to acquire knowledge and understanding of the
recent history and contemporary development of the African Union and the Regional Economic
Communities; and b) to examine the context and consequences of current and emerging global
trends for Africa. The course will seek to challenge you to approach these issues through the
prism of African decision-makers and civil society leaders, and to be able to offer them policy
relevant recommendations.

Fall 2017: Social Movements and Citizenship in Africa

Call Number: 
87548
Points: 
3
Location: 
402 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
M 11:00am-12:50pm
Instructor: 
Jinny Prais

This course focuses on social movements and citizenship in sub-Saharan Africa to examine how people form political and social movements and deploy citizenship strategies within social, historical, and economic structures that are both local and global. It draws on readings and lectures from scholars in history, political science, anthropology, sociology, and African studies to explore the following topics and themes: histories and theories of social movements and citizenship; cities and social movements and citizenship; citizenship outside the nation-state; social movements and democracy; citizenship as a creative enterprise that emphasizes claim-making and improvisation; citizenship within imperial, international, and national contexts; infrastructures, claim-making, and coalition building; opposition, leadership and democracy; and social movements of African youth and women. This course features guest lectures by and discussions with French and American scholars from Sciences-Po, Universite Paris 1, NYU, and Columbia, and is part of the Joint African Studies Program (JASP) at the Institute of African Studies that is supported by the Partnership University Fund (PUF) and the French Alliance Program at Columbia. It includes foundational readings on concepts, theories, and histories of social movements and citizenship in Africa as well as in-depth case studies on selective themes by various experts working on sub-Saharan Africa. It is unique insofar as it offers a strong foundation in social movements and citizenship while exposing students to in-depth case studies by leading experts working in a variety of disciplines and geographical contexts. All lectures and discussions are conducted in English.