Institute of African Studies - Columbia University

Courses

African Language Courses

Spring 2017: ADV ANCIENT EGYPTIAN II

Call Number: 
28626
Points: 
3
Location: 
New York University, ISAW Building (15 East 84th Street), Large Conference Room, 6th Floor
Day/Time: 
T 10:00am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Ogden Goelet and Stephane A Charitos

Corequisites: EGYP W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.
Description: Advanced readings in ancient Egyptian texts. NYU course. Contact sc758@columbia.edu for more information.

Spring 2017: ADVANCED ARABIC GRAMMAR REVIEW

Call Number: 
74638
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Description: Through reading and writing, students will review Arabic Grammar concepts within the context of linguistic functions such as narration, description, comparison, etc. For example, within the function of narration, students will focus on verb tenses, word order, and adverbials. Based on error analysis in the past twelve years that the Arabic Program has been using Al-Kitaab, emphasis will be placed on common and frequent grammatical errors. Within these linguistic functions and based on error analysis, the course will review the following main concepts: Types of sentence and sentence/clause structure.The Verb system, pattern meanings and verb complementation.Quadriliteral verb patterns and derivations.Weak Verbs derivations, conjugation, tense frames and negation.Case endings.Types of noun and participle: Noun of time, place, instance, stance, instrument, active and passive participles.Types of construct phrase: al-iDafa.Types of Adverbials and verb complements: Hal, Tamyiz, Maf’ul mutlaq, Maf’ul li’ajlihi, adverbs of time, frequency, place and manner.The number system and countable nouns.Types of maa.Diptotes, al-mamnu’ min-aSSarf. Notes: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ADVANCED ARABIC GRAMMAR REVIEW

Call Number: 
74638
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Description: Through reading and writing, students will review Arabic Grammar concepts within the context of linguistic functions such as narration, description, comparison, etc. For example, within the function of narration, students will focus on verb tenses, word order, and adverbials. Based on error analysis in the past twelve years that the Arabic Program has been using Al-Kitaab, emphasis will be placed on common and frequent grammatical errors. Within these linguistic functions and based on error analysis, the course will review the following main concepts: Types of sentence and sentence/clause structure.The Verb system, pattern meanings and verb complementation.Quadriliteral verb patterns and derivations.Weak Verbs derivations, conjugation, tense frames and negation.Case endings.Types of noun and participle: Noun of time, place, instance, stance, instrument, active and passive participles.Types of construct phrase: al-iDafa.Types of Adverbials and verb complements: Hal, Tamyiz, Maf’ul mutlaq, Maf’ul li’ajlihi, adverbs of time, frequency, place and manner.The number system and countable nouns.Types of maa.Diptotes, al-mamnu’ min-aSSarf.
Note: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ADVANCED SWAHILI II

Call Number: 
26683
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
Abdul Nanji

Prerequisites: SWHL W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission.
Description: An introduction to the advanced syntactical, morphological, and grammatical structures of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ADVANCED WOLOF II

Call Number: 
28785
Points: 
4
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Spring 2017: ADVANCED ZULU II

Call Number: 
68152
Points: 
3
Day/Time: 
TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission. This course allows students to practice advanced structures of the Zulu language. Please note this course is offered by videoconference from Yale through the Shared Course Initiative.
Description: This course allows students to practice adanced structures of the Zulu language. Please note this course is offered by videoconference from Yale through the Shared Course Initiative.

Spring 2017: ARABIC HERITAGE SPEAKERS II

Call Number: 
70814
Points: 
5
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Youssef Nouhi

Prerequisites: MDES 2208 or instructor permission.
Description: As of academic year 2016-17, this course is now MDES 2209. This is an intensive course that combines the curriculum of both First and Second Year Arabic in two semesters instead of four, and focuses on the productive skills (speaking and writing) in Modern Standard Arabic (Fusha). Students are exposed intensively to grammar and vocabulary of a high register. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to move on to Third Year Arabic.
Note: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ELEMENTARY SWAHILI II

Call Number: 
28597 and 14602
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
TR 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji and Jane N Clayton

Description: Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ELEMENTARY WOLOF II

Call Number: 
12862
Points: 
4
Location: 
351C International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MTWR 12:00pm-12:50pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.
Description: Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: ELEMENTARY YORUBA II

Call Number: 
68968
Points: 
4
Location: 
352B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:00am

Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.
Description: This course is designed to bring students with no background to a point where they can perform most basic linguistic functions in Yoruba, including greetings, likes/dislikes, telling about yourself, describing places and situations, all in appropriate time frames. The class uses a highly interactive classroom style, supplemented by extensive use of video – both prepared and student-produced – and other computer-assisted tools. Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.

Spring 2017: ELEMENTARY ZULU II

Call Number: 
72095
Points: 
4
Location: 
351A International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:35am-12:25pm
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission.

Spring 2017: FIRST YEAR ARABIC I

Call Number: 
27998
Points: 
5
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10pm-11:15pm
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Description: An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: FOURTH YEAR CLASSICAL ARABIC I

Call Number: 
24280
Points: 
4
Instructor: 
Youssef Nouhi

Prerequisites: MDES W4212.
Through reading excerpts from thirteen essential works, starting with Jabarti's history of the French Campaign in Egypt to a chapter from al-Qur'an, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main themes in Classical Arabic literature, acquire a sense of literary style over a period of fourteen centuries as well as literary analytical terminology and concepts. The texts are selections from essential works that the students will read in detail, write critical pieces, engage in discussion and have assignments which will expand their vocabulary, manipulation of advanced grammar concepts, and employing stylistic devices in their writing. This course will enable students to start doing research in classical Arabic sources and complements MESAAS's graduate seminar Readings in Classical Arabic. The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction.
Note: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: FOURTH YEAR MODERN ARABIC II

Call Number: 
68909
Points: 
4
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Prerequisites: MDES W4212.
Description: Through reading articles and essays by Arab thinkers and intellectuals, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main themes in Arab thought The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction.
Note: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: INTERMEDIATE SWAHILI II

Call Number: 
77247
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Prerequisites: SWHL W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.

Spring 2017: INTERMEDIATE WOLOF II

Call Number: 
88651
Points: 
4
Location: 
351C International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MW 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission.
Description: Further develops a student's knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: INTERMEDIATE YORUBA II

Call Number: 
76964
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:05am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Adeolu A Ademoyo

Prerequisites: YORU W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.
Description: In this course, learners will continue practicing all four language skills through every day dialogues, writing letters, and describing basic situations. In addition, they will be introduced to Yoruba literature and learn how to read and comprehend basic Yoruba texts, such as newspaper articles. Finally, they will be introduced to current affairs as well as social, artistic and, cultural events and issues in Nigeria. The class uses a highly interactive classroom style, supplemented by extensive use of video – both prepared and student-produced – and other computer-assisted tools. Please note this course is offered by videoconferencing from Cornell as part of the Shared Course Initiative.

Spring 2017: INTERMEDIATE ZULU II

Call Number: 
10997
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:30am-11:20am
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructor's permission.
Description: Introduces students to the basic structures of Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, especially in the Zululand area of KwaZulu/Natal province.

Spring 2017: INTRO-ANCIENT EGYPTIAN LANG II

Call Number: 
60384
Points: 
3
Location: 
New York University
Instructor: 
Ogden Goelet

Spring 2017: SECOND YEAR ARABIC II

Call Number: 
65659, 63978, and 62993
Points: 
5
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 4:10pm-5:15pm, MTWR 2:40pm-3:55pm and MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Tarik Belhoussein, May Ahmar and Rym Bettaieb

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent.
Description: A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing.
Note: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2017: SUPERVISED READINGS I

YORUBA LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM
Call Number: 
66848
Points: 
2
Instructor: 
Adeolu A Ademoyo

Spring 2017: THIRD YEAR ARABIC II

Call Number: 
29226 and 67697
Points: 
5
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am and MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Description: Students in the regular third-year Arabic track improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through close reading, compositions, class discussions, and presentations in Arabic on topics such as cultures of the Arab world, classical and modern Arabic literature, and contemporary Arabic media. Review of grammatical and syntactic rules as needed.
Notes: No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.


Anthropology

Spring 2017: THE RISE OF CIVILIZATION

Call Number: 
25545
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Terence N D'Altroy

Corequisites: ANTH V1008
Description: The rise of major civilization in prehistory and protohistory throughout the world, from the initial appearance of sedentism, agriculture, and social stratification through the emergence of the archaic empires. Description and analysis of a range of regions that were centers of significant cultural development: Mesopotamia, Egypt, the Indus River Valley, China, North America, and Mesoamerica.

Spring 2017: WORLD ARCHAEOLOGY

Call Number: 
29034
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
F 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Zoe Crossland

Note: Permission Needed From Instructor
Description: This capstone seminar explores global archaeology from a postcolonial perspective. In 2015, we will address key theoretical issues through the consideration of specific case studies in Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and how these impinge upon the politics and practice of archaeology elsewhere in the world. The seminar has a particular focus on questions of ethics, heritage, and indigenous perspectives in the practice of archaeology. It fulfills the major seminar requirement for the archaeology major.


Architecture (GSAPP)

Spring 2017: AFRICAN CITIES

Call Number: 
76847
Points: 
3
Location: 
412 Avery Hall
Day/Time: 
MT 9:00am-11:00am
Instructor: 
Mpho Matsipa

Description: This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history of African cities. It cuts across disciplinary boundaries of history, geography, anthropology, political and cultural sociology, literature and cultural studies, to explore the vaious trajectories of urbanization on the continent.


Art History

Spring 2017: CONGO

Call Number: 
75530
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
M 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Zoe S Strother

Description: African art history reached a new maturity and sophistication in the 1990s through an intense interdisciplinary dialogue on the visual arts in the Congo. Prominent historians, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, artists, and art historians debated the history of Congolese art and changed its future through active patronage. The seminar will cover a wide variety of these texts and will examine the unprecedented role for museum exhibitions in disseminating new interpretations for African art.

Spring 2017: PUB MONUMENT IN ANC NEAR EAST

Call Number: 
65810
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Zainab Bahrani

Description: This seminar will focus on the invention of the public monument as a commemorative genre, and the related concepts of time, memory and history in the ancient Near East and Egypt. Public monuments will be studied in conjunction with readings from ancient texts (in translation), as well as historical criticism, archaeological and art historical theories.


Contemporary Civilization and Literature Humanities

Spring 2017: AFRICAN CIVILIZATION

Call Number: 
27698 and 64748
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MW 4:10am-6:00pm and MW 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Yohann C. Ripert and John F III Straussberger

Note: First Year Students Not Eligible


Dance

Spring 2017: AFRICAN DANCE I

Call Number: 
02154
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.
Description: Concentrates on the dances of West Africa, including Senegal, Mali, and Guinea, and a variety of dances performed at various functions and ceremonies. Explanation of the origin and meaning of each dance will be an integral part of the material presented.


English and Comparative Literature

Spring 2017: AFRICAN CIVILIZATION

Call Number: 
64748 and 27698
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am-12:00pm or MW 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
John F III Straussberger or Yohann C Ripert

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.'

Spring 2017: Plagiarism and Postcolonialism

Call Number: 
87698
Points: 
3
Day/Time: 
MW 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Joseph R Slaughter

This course examines practices of literary plagiarism, piracy, kidnapping, cultural appropriation, forgery, and other disparaged textual activities to consider their implication in the power/knowledge complex of (neo)imperial international relations under current capitalist copyright and intellectual property regimes that constitute the so-called "World Republic of Letters.".....

Spring 2017: South African Literature and Culture

Call Number: 
91446
Points: 
3
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Jennifer Wenzel

Cross-listed in Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies. See below for description.


French Courses

Spring 2017: INTRO - FRANCOPHONE STUDIES II

Call Number: 
08391
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Kaiama L. Glover

Description: Universalism vs. exceptionalism, tradition vs. modernity, integration and exclusion, racial, gender, regional, and national identities are considered in this introduction to the contemporary French-speaking world in Europe, the Americas, and Africa. Authors include: Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sedar Senghor, Frantz Fanon, Maryse Condé.


History Courses

Spring 2017: AFRICA AND FRANCE

Call Number: 
63448
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
R 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

Description: This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current ‘memory wars’ in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa.

Spring 2017: AFRICA,EMPIRE & 20TH CENT WRLD

Call Number: 
97850
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
W 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Jinny K Prais

This seminar offers students an opportunity to deepen their knowledge of African political thought and action during the first half of the twentieth century. It brings together readings from a range of disciplines, including history, colonial and post­colonial studies, women's studies, and literary studies as well as primary documents and novels to explore African intellectuals' engagement with European imperialism and international politics, and their positioning of Africa within the twentieth century world.

Spring 2017: HEALTH & HEALING IN AFRICA

Call Number: 
78779
Points: 
4
Day/Time: 
W 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

Spring 2017: RESEARCH SEMINAR IN AFRICAN HISTORY

Call Number: 
18048
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
T 12:10am-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

International Affairs

Spring 2017: GLOBAL FOOD SYSTEMS

Call Number: 
88942 and 63279
Points: 
3
Location: 
411 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
T 9:00am-10:50am or R 9:00am-10:50am

Description: Introduces and explores systems of producing and ensuring equitable access to food. The course begins with an overview of the core bio-physical elements of food production: land and soil, water and biodiversity. The course then surveys a selection of important smallholder farming systems that provide food and livelihoods for more than two billion people on the planet. Building on this understanding, students will examine the underlying history, science and impact of the Asian Green Revolution that doubled global food supplies between 1970 and 1995. Country case studies from Asia and Africa will be examined to understand the roles of science, policies, politics, institutions and economics in advancing agriculture and food security. This course is restricted to MPA-DP students. Non-MPA-DP students interested in registering for this course should contact the instructor.
Note: This course is restricted to MPA-DP students. Non-MPA-DP students interested in registering for this course should contact the instructor.

Spring 2017: HUMANITARIAN CRISIS IN THE EASTERN DRC

Call Number: 
73496
Points: 
1
Location: 
801 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
F 1:00pm-5:00pm / S 10:00am-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Dennis Dijkzeul

Description: Over the past decades, perhaps no area of the world has seen such violent transformations and complex conflicts as Africa's Great Lakes Region. This 1-credit course focuses on the conflicts and humanitarian assistance in two Eastern Congolese provinces, Kivu Sud and Kivu Nord. Extrapolations based on IRC studies estimate an excess mortality in Eastern DR Congo of over 4 million people out of a total population of about 20 million over the last twenty years. The neighboring countries of DR Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda all play a role in this conflict. Moreover, they have also endured their own forms of traumatic upheaval and are still searching for a form of stability. This course asks why these conflicts endured for so long? What are the root causes? What happens when a state bureaucracy breaks down? What happens to the health care and educational systems? Can solutions be found? What is the role of the humanitarian organizations vis-à-vis the local population, civil society, and the local administration?

Spring 2017: INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMNT & DEV

Call Number: 
86346
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
404 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Joel Moser

Description: How to harmonize the diverse objectives of private investors, public sector officials, multilateral institutions and other key actors in the development of international infrastructure projects. This course will examine the principles underlying global infrastructure investment and explore effective strategies to encourage development of facilities for transportation, water, energy, healthcare and education. The classes will focus primarily upon three or more specific case studies of recent projects. Subjects of examination will include Linha Quatro of the Metrô de São Paulo, the Kenya-Uganda Rift Valley Railway and the Guangdong Province water system. The projects will be examined from the perspectives of financial investors, industrial operators, creditors, including commercial banks and multilateral institutions, government policymakers and the public. Issues discussed will include risk allocation, delivery methods and the evolving cast of global investors.

Spring 2017: POLITICAL ECON OF AFRICAN DEVP

Call Number: 
80779
Points: 
3
Location: 
324 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Akbar Noman

Description: This course focuses on economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa from a political economy perspective. It is divided into three sections. The first section examines the broad economic trends, policies and strategies of the past 50 years. The Washington Consensus and the "lost decades" are examined in some detail. The focus of this part is on economic growth and structural change, notably the controversies around economic policies and institutions. In the second section the course turns to socioeconomic dimensions and aspects of development including poverty, inequality, employment, health, education, and gender. The final section concludes with an examination of the implications of climate change, debates around foreign aid and an overview of what we have learned. Some readings are to be finalized.

Spring 2017: REALITIES OF PEACEKEEPING

Call Number: 
22246
Points: 
3
Location: 
418 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Elisabeth Lindenmayer

Description: The purpose of this course is to prepare students to conduct research both in New York and in a peacekeeping operation and to make a contribution to the field of peacekeeping, building on the body of existing research. Through a combination of desk and field research, students will produce a policy-oriented paper on a subject of interest to both the Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO) and the mission itself. Through a Summer field placement, the course will expose students to the realities of the field, give them a first hand insight into the structure and functioning of a peace keeping operation, a unique understanding of the challenges it faces, and allow them to bridge the gap between theory and practice. Through intensive desk research the course will help students to build their research and analytical skills and familiarize themselves with the range of tools they will need to undertake rigorous, practical and action oriented research in a peace operation. The course aims to provide students with an informed and nuanced understanding of the instrument of peacekeeping. It will examine some of the tools used by PKOs in the Implementation of their mandates and critically assess the usefulness of these tools in achieving their goals, with particular attention to the complex and difficult tasks of peace building and the achievement of sustainable peace. The summer placements will be confirmed through the Spring semester and will include two missions: the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) and the United Nations Mission in Liberia (UNMIL). Students will conduct research in designated field missions for four to six weeks over the summer.

Spring 2017: SOCIAL INVESTMENT & ECONOMIC GROWTH IN E. ASIA

Call Number: 
26296
Points: 
3
Location: 
407 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Yumiko T. Shimabukuro

Description: In recent years, the growing inequality within countries that have achieved enormous economic and democratic advancements has sparked fascinating debates on its causes, consequences, and ramifications. This course investigates the nexus between economic growth and social investment policies (e.g., education, housing, social assistance, labor market policies, and healthcare) and how a variety of factors, including political actors, processes, and institutions, influence the nature of the relationship. It equips students with the theoretical tools, empirical data, and historical materials necessary to better understand regional trends as well as distinctive domestic outcomes. The East Asian experience is set as the starting point, followed by a close examination of reform efforts in Latin America and Africa. Case studies are utilized to delve deeper into specific issues, such as racial divisions, adverse systemic shocks, and gender inequality.

Spring 2017: STATE FORM, VIOLENCE, INTERVENTION - MODERN WORLD

Call Number: 
97596
Points: 
3
Location: 
1302 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Dipali Mukhopadhyay

Description: With a case study on Afghanistan, this seminar in international security policy will introduce students to several generations of literature on state formation and its relationship to violence and foreign intervention. We will explore the resilience and limitations of various theoretical approaches as they relate to a number of empirical cases. Students will become familiarized with a number of important arguments that have been advanced to explain state formation in its more recent incarnations in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, Asia, and post-Communist Europe.

Spring 2017: THE UN: CHANGE OR CONTINUITY?

Call Number: 
97647
Points: 
3
Location: 
402 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
R 11:00am-12:50pm
Instructor: 
John Hirsch

Description: The United Nations Past and Present examines the transformation of the United Nations over the past seventy years with a focus on contemporary efforts to promote international peace and security, development and human rights. With the global availability of the internet and social media, the challenges facing the United Nations from the migration crisis in the Middle East and Africa and climate change to the Ebola crisis require a more coordinated international response. The emergence of major power centers in Asia, Africa and Latin America as well as of non-state actors ranging from international NGOs to multinational corporations create both opportunities and challenges for the United Nations system. The recent adoption of the Sustainable Development Goals (2015-2030) reflects a new awareness of our interconnected global politics. The course will consider the prospects for the United Nations to adapt its international staff and organizational structure to meet these new challenges.

Spring 2017: WHY WE FAIL: LESSONS IN CONFLICT RESOLUT

Call Number: 
26046
Points: 
3
Location: 
402B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Edward C Luck

Description: This course will undertake a comparative assessment of international efforts to resolve armed conflicts and prevent mass atrocities in a series of situations, some of which ended relatively well and some of which did not. In the former category, it will consider Kenya (2008), Guinea (2009), Kyrgyzstan (2010), and Côte d'Ivoire (2010-11), and in the latter Rwanda (1994), Srebrenica (1995), Sri Lanka (2009), and Syria (2011). In each of the eight cases, international decision-making will be examined through both conflict resolution and atrocity prevention lens in order to gain a keener sense of relative priorities and of how efforts to pursue one goal reinforced or complicated the other. The emphasis will be on the UN Security Council and Secretariat, but the policies of key Member States will be considered as well. It has been widely noted that most mass atrocities occur in conflict situations, but there has been little study of whether the respective techniques used to end conflict and to curb atrocities are fully compatible in the context of day-to-day crisis response efforts. The United Nations has authorized or compiled extensive lessons-learned reports on Rwanda, Srebrenica, and Sri Lanka, and there are substantial academic, journalistic, and eye witness accounts of all of the situations other than Guinea and Kyrgyzstan. The instructor will also draw on his personal involvement in United Nations decision-making, as Assistant Secretary-General and Special Adviser for the Responsibility to Protect (R2P), in all of the situations except for the two in the 1990s. Opportunities will be provided for the students to interact with national and international officials who were involved in several of these situations.


Law

Spring 2017: INTERNATIONAL HUMANITARIAN LAW

Call Number: 
76746
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
801 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
FSS 9:00am-5:00pm
Instructor: 
Horst Fischer

Description: The course will be competent in the critical questioning of international humanitarian law (IHL) and international criminal law (ICL) system. Participants will gain an understanding of the historical development and system of international humanitarian law in the context of its political and technological environment. They will study the methods for interpretation of IHL treaties and the identification of customary IHL-law and they will learn to apply IHL to actual conflicts such as the conflicts in Syria, Libya, Iraq, Afghanistan, Lebanon, Sudan and Ukraine. Students will develop and understanding of the preconditions for the punishment of war crimes under ICL. They analyze judgements in fundamental crimes cases. Students will be able to determine which treaty and customary rules need to be applied to actual wars. They will be able select and use the appropriate IHL-rules to determine whether violations have taken place and how perpetrators could be punished.


Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Spring 2017: Africa, Empire, and the 20th Century World

Call Number: 
97850
Location: 
207 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
Wednesdays 12:10-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Jinny Prais

This seminar, taught by the Institute of African Studies' own Dr. Jinny Prais, explores the role of Africa and Africans in imperial and international history during the first half of the twentieth century. It examines African political thought and activities for the ways that Africans contributed to imperial and international discussions, engaged concepts of political modernity, and responded to and participated in world events. It explores African involvement in international movements for racial equality and world peace, proposals for imperial reform, responses to the Italian invasion of Ethiopia, and debates and controversies among African intellectuals of the time. Drawing from new imperial and transnational history and studies of the African diaspora, it explores new frameworks for understanding modern African history.

Spring 2017: COLD WAR ARAB CULTURE

Call Number: 
64506
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
W 4:10am-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Muhsin Al-Musawi

Description: This course studies the effects and strategies of the cold war on Arab writing, education, arts and translation, and the counter movement in Arab culture to have its own identities. As the cold war functioned and still functions on a global scale, thematic and methodological comparisons are drawn with Latin America, India and Africa.

Spring 2017: SOUTH AFRICAN LITERATURE & CULTURE

Call Number: 
91446
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Jennifer Wenzel

Description: In South Africa, the seventy years have seen the legislation of institutionalized racism in the policy known as apartheid; decades of protest and repression; and the emergence of popular movements in South Africa and abroad that compelled the apartheid state to enter a process of negotiation that would ultimately lead to its own demise in the democratic elections of 1994. This course traces the multiple, profoundly important roles that literature and other cultural production have played in the consolidation of apartheid, as well as its demise and aftermath. Although many of our texts were originally written in English, we will discuss the historical forces that have shaped the linguistic texture of South African cultural life.


Political Science

Spring 2017: NAT SECURITY STRAT OF MID EAST

Call Number: 
20024
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
M 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Charles D Freilich

Description: At the crossroads of three continents, the Middle East is home to many diverse peoples, with ancient and proud cultures, in varying stages of political and socio-economic development, often times in conflict. Now in a state of historic flux, the Arab Spring has transformed the Middle Eastern landscape, with great consequence for the national security strategies of the countries of the region and their foreign relations. The primary source of the world's energy resources, the Middle East remains the locus of the terror-WMD-fundamentalist nexus, which continues to pose a significant threat to both regional and international security. The course surveys the national security challenges facing the region's primary players (Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran, Syria and Lebanon, Israel, the Palestinians and Turkey, Jordan) and how the revolutions of the past year will affect them. Unlike many Middle East courses, which focus on US policy in the region, the course concentrates on the regional players' perceptions of the threats and opportunities they face and on the strategies they have adopted to deal with them. It thus provides an essential vantage point for all those interested in gaining a deeper understanding of a region, which stands at the center of many of the foreign policy issues of our era. The course is designed for those with a general interest in the Middle East, especially those interested in national security issues, students of comparative politics and future practitioners, with an interest in "real world" international relations and national security.

Spring 2017: POLITICS MID EAST & NORTH AFRICA

Call Number: 
07620
Points: 
3
Day/Time: 
TR 6:10am-7:25pm
Instructor: 
Lisel Hintz