Institute of African Studies - Columbia University

Courses

African Language Courses

Spring 2022: Advanced Swahili II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11475
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Prerequisites: Advanced Swahili I or the instructor's permission. An introduction to the advanced syntactical, morphological, and grammatical structures of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Advanced Wolof I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11491
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S. Sy

Prerequisites: Two years of Wolof or instructor permission. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Arabic Heritage Speakers II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15153
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Youssef Nouhi

Prerequisites: Instructor permission. This is an intensive course that combines the curriculum of both First and Second Year Arabic in two semesters instead of four, and focuses on the productive skills (speaking and writing) in Modern Standard Arabic (Fusha). Students are exposed intensively to grammar and vocabulary of a high register. After successful completion of this course, students will be able to move on to Third Year Arabic. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Elementary Swahili II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11477
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:10am-10:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Essentials of grammar, basic vocabulary, practice in speaking and reading Swahili the most widely used indigenous language of East Africa. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Elementary Twi (Akan) II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11202
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:00am-9:50am
Instructor: 
Hannah Essien, Stephane A. Charitos

This course is designed as the second part of an elementary language sequence. It is designed for students who will be introduced to the basic structure of Twi and the culture of the Akan-Twi-speaking people. Instruction is in the target language with an expected proficiency goal of Novice Mid at the end of the semester. Students will be introduced to basic grammar and communicative skills as well as cultural activities. This will be reinforced through role plays, conversations, dialogues and songs. At the end of the course, students are expected to acquire basic grammar competence and be able to use appropriate expressions for everyday situations with an understanding and appreciation of the culture of the Akan people in Ghana, West Africa. In addition to Asante Twi, students will be exposed to Akuapem Twi and Fante.

Spring 2022: Elementary Wolof II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11478
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 12:10pm-1:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S. Sy

Introduction to the basic grammatical structures of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Elementary Zulu II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11206
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWRF 11:35am-12:25pm
Instructor: 
Stephane A. Charitos

Prerequisites: ZULU W1201-W1202 or the instructors permission. Introduces students to the basic structures of Zulu, a Bantu language spoken in South Africa, especially in the Zululand area of KwaZulu/Natal province.

Spring 2022: First Year Arabic I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15146
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
TBA

An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class

Spring 2022: First Year Arabic II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15147
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
TBA

Prerequisites: First Year Arabic I or instructor permission. An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2022: First Year Arabic II

Section: 
002
Call Number: 
15148
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
TBA

Prerequisites: First Year Arabic I or instructor permission. An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2022: First Year Arabic II

Section: 
003
Call Number: 
15149
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 1:10pm-2:15pm
Instructor: 
TBA

Prerequisites: First Year Arabic I or instructor permission. An introduction to the language of classical and modern Arabic literature. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2022: Fourth Year Modern Arabic II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15154
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Prerequisites: MDES W4212. Through reading articles and essays by Arab thinkers and intellectuals of the Twentieth century, starting from the period called Nahda (Renaissance), such as Taha Hussein, Qasim Amin, Abdallah Laroui, Abed Al-Jabiri, Tahar Haddad, Fatima Mernissi and others, students will be able to increase their fluency and accuracy in Arabic while working on reading text and being exposed to the main
themes in Arab thought. The course works with all four skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing). Arabic is the language of instruction. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Intermediate Swahili II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11476
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Prerequisites: SWHL W1101-W1102 or the instructors permission. A review of the essentials of Swahili grammar; detailed analysis of Swahili texts; practice in conversation. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Intermediate Wolof II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11490
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S. Sy

Prerequisites: WLOF W1101-W1102 or the instructors permission. Further develops a students knowledge of Wolof, a major language of West Africa spoken primarily in Senegal and Gambia. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Second Year Arabic I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15150
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Second Year Arabic II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15151
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Second Year Arabic II

Section: 
002
Call Number: 
15152
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Prerequisites: MDES W1210-W1211 or the equivalent. A continuation of the study of the language of contemporary writing. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS

Spring 2022: Third Year Arabic II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13638
Points: 
5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
Reem Faraj

Students in the regular third-year Arabic track improve reading, writing, speaking, and listening skills through close reading, compositions, class discussions, and presentations in Arabic on topics such as cultures of the Arab world, classical and modern Arabic literature, and contemporary Arabic media. Review of grammatical and syntactic rules as needed. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Department MESAAS


Africana Studies

Spring 2022: Introduction African Diaspora

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00463
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Celia E. Naylor

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the African diaspora in the Americas: its motivations, dimensions, consequences, and the importance and stakes of its study. Beginning with the contacts between Africans and the Portuguese in the 15th century, this class will open up diverse paths of inquiry as students attempt to answer questions, clear up misconceptions, and challenge assumptions about the presence of Africans in the New World.

Spring 2022: Queer Caribbean Critique

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00464
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 10:00am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Maja Horn

This seminar analyzes the different critical approaches to studying same-sex desire in the Caribbean region. The region’s long history of indigenous genocide, colonialism, imperialism, and neo-liberalism, have made questions about “indigenous” and properly “local” forms of sexuality more complicated than in many other regions. In response, critics have worked to recover and account for local forms of same-sex sexuality and articulated their differences in critical and theoretical terms outside the language of “coming out” and LGBT identity politics. On the other hand, critics have emphasized how outside forces of colonialism, imperialism, and the globalization of LGBT politics have impacted and reshaped Caribbean same-sex desires and subjectivities. This course studies these various critical tendencies in the different contexts of the Anglophone, Francophone, Hispanophone, and Dutch Caribbean.

Spring 2022: Shange & Digital Storytelling

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00514
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Kim F. Hall

Prerequisites: Enrollment limited to 12 students. Permission of the instructor required. Interested students should complete the application at: http://bit.ly/ShangeWorlds. Students should have taken a course beyond the intro level from ONE of the following areas: American Literature (through the English Department), Africana Studies, American Studies, Theatre or Womens Studies. Please note that this is a yearlong course; students who are accepted into this course will need to take its second half, AFEN BC3816, in the spring semester. A poet, performance artist, playwright and novelist, Ntozake Shanges stylistic innovations in drama, poetry and fiction and attention to the untold lives of black women have made her an influential figure throughout American arts and in Feminist history. In a unique collaboration between Barnard, the Schomburg Center for Black Culture and the International Center for Photography, and with support by the Mellon funded Barnard Teaches grant, this year long seminar provides an in-depth exploration of Shanges work and milieu as well as an introduction to digital tools, public research and archival practice. You can find more information and apply for the course at http://bit.ly/ShangeWorlds. On Twitter @ShangeWorlds.

Spring 2022: The Africana Colloquium

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00465
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Celia E. Naylor

This course examines shakespeare’s role in shaping western ideas about blackness, in processes of racial formation, and in black freedom struggle. as one of the most enduring representations of a black man in western art shakespeare’s othello will be a focal point. however, this course will examine other “race” plays as well as works perceived as “race-neutral” in tandem with black “respeakings” of shakespeare’s works. this class is antiracist in intent and is shaped by several interlocking questions: what is black shakespeare? can creators and scholars separate shakespeare from the apparatus of white supremacy that has been built around his works? what are the challenges for bipoc actors performing shakespeare on the dominant stage? can performing shakespeare be an activist endeavor? possible readings: keith hamilton cobb, american moor; abdias donascimento, sortilégio-mistério negro; djanet sears, harlem duet; william shakespeare, hamlet, othello, richard ii, the sonnets; caroline randall williams, lucy negro, redux.


Anthropology

Spring 2022: African Urbanism

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00522
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Brian Larkin

This class examines the production and experience of contemporary African urban life. It examines emerging questions coming out of Africa about the nature of ‘ordinary’ cities; urban informality and the rise of so-called ‘slum urbanism’; urban infrastructures; religions and the production of enclave urbanism; transport and informal labor; and the sensory experience of ordinary urban life. We will also explore different ways of understanding and representing the city including photography, film, sound, and art.


Architecture (GSAPP)

Spring 2022: Building The Engine: Industry + The African Urban Agenda

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15213
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
F 9:00am-1:00pm
Instructor: 
Fatou K. Dieye

Art History

Spring 2022: African American Artists in 20/21 Century

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13788
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Kellie Jones

This course is a survey of visual production by North Americans of African descent from 1900 to the present. It will look at the various ways in which these artists have sought to develop an African American presence in the visual arts over the last century. We will discuss such issues as: what role does stylistic concern play; how are ideas of romanticism, modernism, and formalism incorporated into the work; in what ways do issues of postmodernism, feminism, and cultural nationalism impact on the methods used to portray the cultural and political body that is African America? There will be four guest lectures for this class; all will be held via zoom.

Spring 2022: Art and Theory in a Global Context

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15225
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
John Rajchman

What is “globalization”? How does it change the way we think about or show art today? What role does film and media play in it? How has critical theory itself assumed new forms in this configuration moving outside post-war Europe and America? How have these processes helped change with the very idea of ‘contemporary art’? What then might a transnational critical theory in art and in thinking look like today or in the 21st century? In this course we will examine this cluster of questions from a number of different angles, starting with new questions about borders, displacements, translations and minorities, and the ways they have cut across and figured in different regions, in Europe or America, as elsewhere. In the course of our investigations, we will look in particular at two areas in which these questions are being raised today -- in Asia and in Africa and its diasporas. The course is thus inter-disciplinary in nature and is open to students in different fields and areas where these issues are now being discussed.

Spring 2022: Contemporary Arts of Africa

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13731
Points: 
4
Location: 
34 Schermerhorn Hall
Day/Time: 
W 10:10am-12pm
Instructor: 
Z.S. Strother

This course takes up a question posed by Terry Smith and applies it to Africa: "Who gets to say what counts as contemporary art?" It will investigate the impact of modernity, modernism, and increasing globalism on artistic practices with a special focus on three of the major centers for contemporary art in sub-Saharan Africa: Senegal, South Africa, Nigeria. Some of the topics covered will be: the emergence of new media (such as photography or cinema), the creation of "national" cultures, experiments in Pan-Africanism, diasporic consciousness, and the rise of curators as international culture-brokers. The course will examine the enthusiastic embrace by African artists of the biennial platform as a site for the production of contemporary art. What differential impact has French vs. British colonialism left on the arts? How are contemporary artists responding to calls for restitution on African cultural heritage?

AHIS UN3503 Contemporary Arts of Africa
CC/GS/SEAS: Partial fulfillment of Global Core requirement.


Columbia College

Spring 2022: African Civilization

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11037
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Laura Fair

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa and ‘being African.
Field(s): AFR*. NO FIRST YEAR STUDENTS PERMITTED.

Spring 2022: European Lit-Philos Masterpieces II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12787
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 8:10am-10:00am
Instructor: 
Caio M. Ferreira

Taught by members of the Departments of Classics; English and Comparative Literature; French; German; Italian; Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies; Philosophy; Religion; Slavic Languages; and Spanish; as well as members of the Society of Fellows. Major works by over twenty authors, ranging in time, theme, and genre, from Homer to Virginia Woolf. Students are expected to write at least two papers, to complete two examinations each semester, and to participate actively in class discussions.

PLEASE NOTE: This course has sections 001-076 with multiple call numbers.


Dance

Spring 2022: African Dance I

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00659
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:15am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Concentrates on the dances of West Africa, including Senegal, Mali, and Guinea, and a variety of dances performed at various functions and ceremonies. Explanation of the origin and meaning of each dance will be an integral part of the material presented.

Spring 2022: African Dance II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00660
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 9:00am-10:00am
Instructor: 
Maguette Camara

Prerequisites: DNCE BC2252 or permission of instructor.

Spring 2022: Afro-Cuban Dance

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00661
Points: 
0-1
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
F 3:00pm-5:00pm
Instructor: 
Rebecca Bliss

Prerequisites: Permission of Instructor. This class will introduce students to the African-based folkloric and popular dances of Cuba, including Orisha, Rumba, and Salsa. In addition to learning rhythms and dances, these forms will be contextualized within the historical and contemporary significance of Afro-Cuban dance performance.

Spring 2022: World Dance History

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00669
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Seth S. Williams

Investigates the multicultural perspectives of dance in major areas of culture, including African, Asian, Hispanic, Indian, Middle Eastern, as well as dance history of the Americas through reading, writing, viewing, and discussion of a wide range of resources. These include film, original documents, demonstration, and performance.


English and Comparative Literature

Spring 2022: Global Anglophone Drama

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14448
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Rebecca Kastleman

This seminar explores a wide range of twentieth- and twenty-first century dramas from Africa, the Caribbean, South Asia, and North America as well as their diverse diaspora cultures. We investigate how theater artists have worked to dismatle imperial structures and to make sense of the social and material conditions that persist in the wake of colonial violence. Reading internationally renowned playwrights such as Derek Walcott, Wole Soyinka, and Cherrie Moraga as well as emerging contemporary dramatists, we consider how these playwrights have enagaged with the cultures, economies, and ecologies of imperialism. In the process, we discover how dramatic literature invents new vocabularies for describing and theorizing diaspora, migration, and transcultural exchange. Drawing upon criticial approaches from theater and performances studies as well as postcolonial theory, we ask how dramatists receive and reinterpret a model of the global Anglophone world. We also track how theories of global Anglophone literature are themselves entagled with the language and practice of performace.


French Courses

Spring 2022: History of the French Language

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00433
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Laurie Postlewate

This seminar examines the history of the French language, both in France and in the many areas of the world in which French is a primary language. In the first part of the semester we engage in a chronological study of how the language emerged from a fusion of late medieval Latin with Germanic dialects to become a strong national institution. The development of the language is contextualized by consideration of the social and political history of France. We also devote two weeks of discussion to the situation of the French language today, with topics such as linguistic legislation, regional languages and dialects today, and gender inclusivity. This diachronic approach is carried over into the second part of the semester in which we concentrate on French in several regions outside of France including the Caribbean, North Africa, Central Africa, and North America. Here we examine how the language was first introduced, what it represented at different moments in history, the relation of French to other languages, and the situation of French in the region today. Work for the course includes a digital project (digital timeline and map, and website) to document visually the presence of French in the world, across history and in the 21st century.

Department French @ Barnard


History Courses

Spring 2022: African Voices and Colonial Documents: Ugandan History

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12868
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannan Stephens

This course introduces students to researching and writing African colonial history with a specific focus on Uganda. Students will be guided through the missionary sources available at Columbia and we will discuss how African voices can and cannot be found in these archives. At the end of the semester students will have produced an original primary source paper on Ugandan history.

Spring 2022: Failed Empire: Sweden in the Early Modern

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00193
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Carl Wennerlind

The geopolitical map of the world was in flux during the seventeenth century. As Spain was losing its control over Europe and the Atlantic world, a number of ambitious small states on the periphery of Europe set their sights on achieving imperial glory. By mid-century, The Dutch Republic, England, and Sweden were the primary contenders. Each nation developed a sense of manifest destiny and dedicated scarce resources to establish an imperial presence, from which they could conquer the world. While the former two nations succeeded in creating vast empires, the latter enjoyed only a brief stint as a world power. This failure had nothing to do with a lack of effort or moral considerations. This course explores Sweden’s imperial efforts and investigates its failures. It examines how military, political, religious, commercial, and scientific endeavors contributed to Sweden’s quest for riches and prominence. The seminar begins by discussing Sweden’s sudden military success during the Thirty Years’ War and the consequent formation of a Baltic empire. We next investigate Sweden’s presence on the west coast of Africa, where it built fort Carlsborg, and the east coast of North America, where it founded New Sweden. While these ventures failed relatively rapidly, Sweden continued to pursue a colonial presence through trade and the acquisition in 1784 of St. Barthélemy, a colony from which they engaged in trade, including the slave trade.

Department History @ Barnard

Spring 2022: French America 1534-1804

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13082
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Pierre Force

A study of the French Atlantic World from the exploration of Canada to the Louisiana Purchase and Haitian Independence, with a focus on the relationship between war and trade, forms of intercultural negotiation, the economics of slavery, and the changing meaning of race. The demise of the First French Colonial Empire occurred in two stages: the British victory at the end of the Seven Years War in 1763, and the proclamation of Haitian Independence by insurgent slaves in 1804. The first French presence in the New World was the exploration of the Gulf of St. Lawrence by Jacques Cartier in 1534. At its peak the French Atlantic Empire included one-third of the North American continent, as well as the richest and most productive sugar and coffee plantations in the world. By following the history of French colonization in North America and the Caribbean, this class aims to provide students with a different perspective on the history of the Western hemisphere, and on US history itself. At the heart of the subject is the encounter between Europeans and Native Americans and between Europeans and Africans. We will focus the discussion on a few issues: the strengths and weaknesses of French imperial control as compared with the Spanish and the British; the social, political, military, and religious dimensions of relations with Native Americans; the extraordinary prosperity and fragility of the plantation system; evolving notions of race and citizenship; and how the French Atlantic Empire shaped the history of the emerging United States.

Spring 2022: Histories of Poverty in Africa

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12869
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannan Stephens

Spring 2022: The Ottoman Empire

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12809
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Tunc Sen

This course will cover the seven-century long history of the Ottoman Empire, which spanned Europe, Asia, and Africa as well as the medieval, early modern, and modern period. The many levels of continuity and change will be the focus, as will issues of identities and mentalities, confessional diversity, cultural and linguistic pluralism, and imperial governance and political belonging of the empire within larger regional and global perspectives over the centuries. The course also seeks to cultivate appreciation of the human experience through the multifarious experiences culled from the Ottoman past.


Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Spring 2022: Advanced Arabic Grammar Review

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16950
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Through reading and writing, students will review Arabic Grammar concepts within the context of linguistic functions such as narration, description, comparison, etc. For example, within the function of narration, students will focus on verb tenses, word order, and adverbials. Based on error analysis in the past twelve years that the Arabic Program has been using Al-Kitaab, emphasis will be placed on common and frequent grammatical errors. Within these linguistic functions and based on error analysis, the course will review the following main concepts: Types of sentence and sentence/clause structure. The Verb system, pattern meanings and verb complementation. Quadriliteral verb patterns and derivations. Weak Verbs derivations, conjugation, tense frames and negation. Case endings. Types of noun and participle: Noun of time, place, instance, stance, instrument, active and passive participles. Types of construct phrase: al-iDafa. Types of Adverbials and verb complements: Hal, Tamyiz, Maf’ul mutlaq, Maf’ul li’ajlihi, adverbs of time, frequency, place and manner. The number system and countable nouns. Types of maa.Diptotes, al-mamnu’ min-aSSarf. No P/D/F or R credit is allowed for this class.

Spring 2022: Arabic Literature as World Literature

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11993
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Sarah Bin Tyeer

This seminar focuses on Arabic literature in the world, as World Literature. The focus will be on pre-modern and modern Arabic literary works that traveled and circulated and were adapted to and acquired individual meanings in different cultures. We will look at literary works that achieved ‘worldliness’ through either writing back to the center or through international literary prizes. We will consider how literary works travel and circulate through their fusion with regional concepts, or even take on new meanings at different times and places. Admittedly, also, we will look into the strengths, weaknesses, and criticism surrounding World Literature.

Spring 2022: Colonialism

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11530
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Timothy Mitchell

The seminar on Colonialism examines questions of political economy and politics through the study of colonial regimes of power and knowledge. It has a particular focus on the genealogy of the business corporation, a colonial form of power that became central to the modern world but often escapes the
attention of critical political theory. The readings cover the Middle East, South Asia, and Africa, across the period from the seventeenth to the early twentieth century. The seminar is intended primarily for Ph.D. students interested in interdisciplinary approaches to the study of politics, political economy, and colonial history. For course requirements and other information, see CourseWorks.

Spring 2022: Critical Theory: A Global Perspective

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15185
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Nadia Sariahmed

The purpose of this foundational course is to introduce Columbia undergraduate students, in the context of their Global Core curriculum, to the seminal field of critical theory. The historical domain of this course is within the last century and its geographical spectrum is global. European critical thinkers are included in this course but not privileged. Thinkers from Asia, Africa, Europe, North, South, and Latin America, are examined here in chronological order and in equal democratic footing with each other. This course as a result is decidedly cross-cultural, one step forward towards de-alienating critical thinkers from around the globe and the issues they address without pigeonholing them as something “other” or “different.” The course is designed and offered in the true spirit of the “Global Core.” The purpose of the course is to reach for the common denominator of serious critical thinking about the fate of our humanity and the health of our social relations in an increasingly fragile world—where the false binaries of “the West” and “the Rest” no longer hold. The roster of critical thinkers we will examine is by no means exhaustive but representative. Any number of other critical thinkers can be added to this roster but none of those we will examine can be excluded from them. The course is divided into thirteen successive weeks and for each week a number of seminal, original, and groundbreaking texts are identified. Each week we will examine selected passages from these texts. The course is designed as a lecture course, and my lectures are based on the totality of these texts but students will be assigned specific shorter passages to read.

Corequisites: MDES UN1001. Discussion sections (TWO) to accompany the course MDES UN1001, Critical Theory: A Global Perspective. Call numbers 15186-15191

Spring 2022: Dissertation Colloquium

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12007
Points: 
0
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Gil Hochberg

The dissertation colloquium is a non-credit course open to MESAAS doctoral students who have completed the M.Phil. degree. It provides a forum in which the entire community of dissertation writers meets, bridging the departments different fields and regions of research. It complements workshops outside the department focused on one area or theme. Through an encounter with the diversity of research underway in MESAAS, participants learn to engage with work anchored in different regions and disciplines and discover or develop what is common in the departments post-disciplinary methods of inquiry. Since the community is relatively small, it is expected that all post-M.Phil. students in residence will join the colloquium. Post M.Phil. students from other departments may request permission to join the colloquium, but places for non-MESAAS students will be limited. The colloquium convenes every semester, meeting once every two weeks. Each meeting is devoted to the discussion of one or two pre-circulated pieces of work (a draft prospectus or dissertation chapter). Every participant contributes at least one piece of work each year.

Spring 2022: Histories of Urban Africa: Work, Leisure, Love, and Creative Young Lives

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16816
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Laura Fair

This course has multiple aims: to introduce students to the broad historiographical trends in the study of urban Africa, to acquaint students with some of the key issues and problems that have dominated studies of African cities, to examine key fulcrums of generational struggle in 20th century Africa, and to inspire deep thought and appreciation for the ways in which both theoretic questions and empirical methods impact our understanding of the past. This is a research seminar. Students will produce a research paper, focused in an African city, based on their original analysis of primary sources. We will explore the processes by which urban communities were built, and the various ways states and common people shaped the physical, material, social and cultural life of African cities. Gender and generation will be central foci in our analysis. Our readings will include both ‘classic texts’ and more recent scholarship on urban Africa. Our aims are to understand how the questions and concerns dominating urban studies have changed over time, as well as how scholars from various disciplines have utilized primary sources to approach the study of Africa’s urban past.

Spring 2022: Honors Theris Seminar Part 2

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12071
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Hamid Dabashi

The MESAAS honors seminar offers the opportunity to undertake a sustained research project working closely with an individual faculty adviser. It also enables you, as part of a small group of MESAAS students working with the seminar instructor, to develop the skills of academic research and writing and learn how to collaborate with peers and create an engaged intellectual community. This 3-point seminar continues the work begun in the Fall semester of the senior year in MDES 3960 Honors Thesis Seminar Part 1.

Spring 2022: What is Islam?

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13428
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Wael Hallaq

One in four people in the world is a Muslim. Yet, here in the Western hemisphere, we mostly know next to nothing about Islam and its followers. Whatever is spread around as knowledge of this culture and religion is the work of a media that is highly politicized and biased, often perpetuating negative and even racist images of Muslims and their ways of life. This picture becomes even more complicated and complex in academia, in the West in particular but in Islamic countries as well. The story of “What is Islam?” begins in the 19th century, when the bulk of the Muslim world fell under European control, be it direct colonialism or (remote-control) coloniality. Almost everywhere, so-called reform was undertaken, with the view of modernizing institutions and subjectivities along Western lines. With secularization and unprecedented forms of politics and political organization, Islamic cultures all over the world began to undergo epistemic transformations, leading to a wholesale revaluation of the Islamic traditions themselves, and their meaning in late modernity. Various groups would attempt to redefine Islam in fundamentalist terms – in unconscious emulation of American Fundamentalist movements – while others took it in different directions, not excluding Marxism, socialism, and nationalism. But the hegemonic and almost “natural” force driving the Islamic world over the last half century has been liberalism, a powerful way of seeing and evaluating the world that deeply affected even the Islamist movements. Islam for modern Muslims has become many disparate things, often if not always incompatible with each other.


Other Departments

Spring 2022: Biol-African Animals and Ecosystems

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11985
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TBA
Instructor: 
Dustin Rubenstein

Ecology, Evolution, and Environmental Biology
OC3920

Spring 2022: Colonization/Decolonization

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10725
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Emma Crane

Prerequisites: Open to CSER majors/concentrators only. Others may be allowed to register with the instructors permission. This course explores the centrality of colonialism in the making of the modern world, emphasizing cross-cultural and social contact, exchange, and relations of power; dynamics of conquest and resistance; and discourses of civilization, empire, freedom, nationalism, and human rights, from 1500 to 2000. Topics include pre-modern empires; European exploration, contact, and conquest in the new world; Atlantic-world slavery and emancipation; and European and Japanese colonialism in Asia, Africa, and the Middle East. The course ends with a section on decolonization and post-colonialism in the period after World War II. Intensive reading and discussion of primary documents.

Department Ethnicity and Race, Center for

Spring 2022: Comparativc Study of Constitutional Challenges

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10716
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Elizabeth Ouyang

This course will examine how the American legal system decided constitutional challenges affecting the empowerment of African, Latino, and Asian American communities from the 19th century to the present. Focus will be on the role that race, citizenship, capitalism/labor, property, and ownership played in the court decision in the context of the historical, social, and political conditions existing at the time. Topics include the denial of citizenship and naturalization to slaves and immigrants, government sanctioned segregation, the struggle for reparations for descendants of slavery, and Japanese Americans during World War II.

Department of Ethnicity and Race, Center for

Spring 2022: Early America to 1763

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00089
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Andrew C. Lipman

This course examines the three critical centuries from 1492 to 1763 that transformed North America from a diverse landscape teeming with hundreds of farming and hunting societies into a partly-colonized land where just three systems empires held sway. Major themes include contrasting faiths, power relationships, and cultural exchanges among various Native, European, and African peoples.This course examines the three critical centuries from 1492 to 1763 that transformed North America from a diverse landscape teeming with hundreds of farming and hunting societies into a partly-colonized land where just three systems empires held sway. Major themes include contrasting faiths, power relationships, and cultural exchanges among various Native, European, and African peoples.

Department History @ Barnard

Spring 2022: Empire and Decolonialization in North Africa

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14075
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mohamed Ait Amer Meziane

The course examines crucial debates in colonial and decolonial studies from a North African point of view, with a particular focus on Algeria. What does it mean to rethink conceptually and globally about empire and decoloniality from the point of view of North Africa ; a region which is often marginalized in both postcolonial and decolonial theory? The questions that will guide us throughout the class read as follows:
1) How is one to rethink the Maghreb without either reducing it to the history of French colonialism or downplaying the impact of colonialism on North Africa? How can binaries of direct rule and indirect rule, settler colonialism in Algeria and protectorates in Morocco and Tunisia be challenged in order to understand the postcolonial Maghreb as a unit?
2) Can one think about the historicity of the Maghreb without taking the destruction of Al-Andalus and its influence on the birth of race as a point of departure? Does the Christian racialization of Jews and Muslims through the notion of a purity of blood permeate the French colonization of the Maghreb? Is French colonialism in North Africa secular or Christian? How does secularity emerge in the midst of this history by reconfiguring the legacy of the Crusades?
3) How are Muslims and particularly Sufi orders involved in the practices of resistance against French colonial violence? How are traditional Islamic languages and practices of sainthood or the longing of the Mahdi redeployed in this situation? How do these practices and languages of resistance transform themselves with the construction of anticolonial nationalism? How can one rethink decolonization by analyzing how Algiers became the capital of Third World resistance at a global scale?
4) How do contemporary debates about Islam, tradition and modernity deploy themselves in the Maghreb and particularly in Morocco? How do these debates shape our understanding of decolonization?

Department Religion

Spring 2022: Global Ethics

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13914
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Robert L. Klitzman

Increasingly, issues of medical research and clinical care are posing complex ethical issues not only in the United States, but in other countries in both the industrialized and the developing world. Yet varying economic, political, social, cultural, and historical contexts shape these issues. In diverse contexts in Asia, Africa, Europe and North and South America, practices and policies, along with cultures and moral values, differ enormously. Yet ethical issues are arising not in isolation, but as part of global communities and discourses. In research, multinational pharmaceutical companies are increasingly conducting studies in both industrialized countries and the developing world, posing numerous ethical tensions. In clinical care, uses of reproductive technologies differ across national borders, leading to “reproductive tourism”. End of life care varies widely, reflecting in part differing attitudes toward death and dying. This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, philosophical, medical, and historical roots and implications of these issues. The course meets once a week online for an hour and a half, and offers extensive live-session interaction and post-session discussion forums to explore the various bioethical issues contemplated throughout the semester.

Department School of Professional Studies

Spring 2022: Global Ethics

Section: 
D02
Call Number: 
13919
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 6:15pm-7:45pm
Instructor: 
Robert L. Klitzman

Increasingly, issues of medical research and clinical care are posing complex ethical issues not only in the United States, but in other countries in both the industrialized and the developing world. Yet varying economic, political, social, cultural, and historical contexts shape these issues. In diverse contexts in Asia, Africa, Europe and North and South America, practices and policies, along with cultures and moral values, differ enormously. Yet ethical issues are arising not in isolation, but as part of global communities and discourses. In research, multinational pharmaceutical companies are increasingly conducting studies in both industrialized countries and the developing world, posing numerous ethical tensions. In clinical care, uses of reproductive technologies differ across national borders, leading to “reproductive tourism”. End of life care varies widely, reflecting in part differing attitudes toward death and dying. This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, philosophical, medical, and historical roots and implications of these issues. The course meets once a week online for an hour and a half, and offers extensive live-session interaction and post-session discussion forums to explore the various bioethical issues contemplated throughout the semester.

Department School of Professional Studies

Spring 2022: Global Immersion: African's Consumer Market

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14544
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 12:10pm-1:40pm
Instructor: 
Stephan Meier

School of Business B8779

Spring 2022: Global Long-Form Photography: History and Memory

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00001
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Diana Matar

In this course, we ask - how photography, arguably the artistic medium most tied to the present - can be used to explore the past. How have photographers from Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas explored inherited personal and familial legacies? Moving beyond the personal, how have practitioners used the photo essay to explore collective memory? How have they reinterpreted national narratives about dictatorship, war, state-sponsored violence, and environmental destruction? We will be looking at photography as an epistemology. That is – asking how are life's big questions addressed through the medium? Students will view book-length photographic essays produced by some of the world's most respected photographers. Critically, many of those will be outside the North American photographic canon. Photographers include, An My Le, Fazal Sheik, Paula Luttringer, Yael Martinez, Joshua Lutz, Rena Effendi, Rebecca Norris Webb, Kikuji Kawada, Chloe Dewey Mathews, Sophie Ristelhueber, Marcos Adandia, Myako Isiuchi, and others. Critical readings in photography and memory will augment viewings of their works. Over the course of the term, students will develop and deliver their own in-depth photographic essay on a subject of their choice that the instructor has approved. Each student will have two peer critiques of their project. We will explore subject matter, editing, and how testimony and archive are used to give a more contextual reading to long-form photography. This is a demanding seminar/studio class. Students are expected to be making photographic work throughout the semester. Response papers are due weekly, and students must participate in discussions and critiques of each other's works. Over the course of the term, students will develop and deliver an in-depth photographic essay on a subject of their choice that has been approved by the instructor. We will explore subject matter, editing and ways in which testimony and archive can be used to give a more contextual reading to long form photography. We will study photography as an epistemology in and of itself – that is we will look at long-form photography by the study and critique of photographic essays and photographic monographs. Critically we will be looking beyond the North American photographic canon to view the works of global image-makers. Some of the photographers whose in-depth work we will be exploring are: An My Le; Lu Guang; Paula Luttringer; Ori Gherst; Rula Halawani; Luis Gon

Department Comparative Literature and Society @ Barnard

Spring 2022: Intro-Francophone Studies II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14315
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am - 11:25am
Instructor: 
Souleymane B. Diagne

Prerequisites: FREN UN3405 Advanced Grammar and Composition or an AP score of 5 or the director of undergraduate studies permission. Universalism vs. exceptionalism, tradition vs. modernity, integration and exclusion, racial, gender, regional, and national identities are considered in this introduction to the contemporary French-speaking world in Europe, the Americas, and Africa. Authors include: Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sedar Senghor, Frantz Fanon, Maryse Condé.

Spring 2022: Lusophone African and African Brazilian cultures

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13872
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 4:10pm-5:25pm
Instructor: 
Joao Nemi Neto

This course focuses on Lusophone African and African Brazilian cultures and the relations, continuities, ruptures and influences between them. Brazil is the result of the miscegenation of Ameridians, African and Europeans, and this means that is also a cultural mélange of these groups. The African cultural contribution to Brazilian culture and grand-narrative is the primary focus of this course, however, to understand Brazil one needs to understand the cultural diversity found in Lusophone Africa, with which Brazil has had a long relationship. The readings for this course include texts from different disciplines and genres. We will study texts, movies and other forms of visual arts from the following authors: José Eduardo Agualusa, Pepetela, Mia Couto, Jorge Amado, Achille, Mbembe, Hilton Costa, Jocélio Teles dos Santos, Livio Sansone, José Luis Cabaço, Benedita da Silva and Solano Trindade.

Spring 2022: Mothers

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11881
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Gil Anidjar

It might be an exaggeration to say that religion begins with mothers. More accurate, perhaps, would be the suggestion that birth being paradigmatic of all origins and beginnings, all creation stories, mothers might serve as the ultimate metaphorical resource to think religion (and a few other things). And then there is of course the Great Mother, the matriarchal origins of the divine, as well as the contested matriarchy at the origins of human society. We will consider as many mothers as we can, beginning with specific mothers, mothers like Eve and Hagar, and “Mother India” too. We will attend to Mary, Mother of God, and we will consider matricide and maternal infanticide too. We will learn about the “mother tongue” and African matriarchy. Throughout we will explore the mother and the maternal as religious and theoretical questions — with a little help from psychoanalysis’ mothers.

Department Religion

Spring 2022: Race, Law, and Culture in Latin America

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13746
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Silvio L. de Almeida, Tinker Visiting Professor

This interdisciplinary course explores how the socio-economic, cultural, and legal foundations, institutions, and politics of the Latin America were shaped by the legacy of slavery and structural racism. It covers the origin of the political and juridical systems of selected Latin American countries, including Haiti, Cuba, and Brazil, with a focus on how race set the limits of and impeded the exercise of popular citizenship. Adopting an Afro-diasporic perspective, more specifically the idea of “Amefricanidade” (by Lelia Gonzalez), the course will illuminate the political and cultural situation in Latin American and Caribbean countries. The definition of law used in this course is not limited to understanding law as a “system of rules”. We will work on law as part of the historical dynamics of socioeconomic life and culture in the Latin American countries analyzed. Thus, the course will analyze more specifically how race relations and practices of popular citizenship have shaped legal and extralegal spheres, including ways that cultural production, performance, and embodied practices have reshaped and negotiated Latin America's legal systems. The course will provide an overview of the relationship between racial issues and the formation of legal institutions in Latin America, with an emphasis on Brazil, Cuba and Haiti, given the strong African presence, black culture, African diasporic religiosity, and the socioeconomic impacts of slavery and structural racism in the social formation of these countries, which can serve as a comparative model for analysis with other countries in Latin America and the Southern United States. Objectives: Learn to detect and assess the impacts of racialization in legal, political, aesthetic, and social structures across a variety of cultural and national contexts in the Americas. More generally, this class seeks to apply academic theories on race relations and cultural studies since the 1500s to analyzing the economics, politics, and performances of race in shaping social life the Americas.

Spring 2022: Reproductive Justice Movements: Black Bodies in a Patriarchal Society

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16858
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MWF 9:00am-3:30pm
Instructor: 
Latanya Mapp Frett

Description Black history is a subject that has been largely repressed, rewritten, and condensed in the cataloging of American history. The colonization of Africa, the centuries of slavery, and the subsequent discrimination and marginalization of people of African descent have all contributed to an under-representation of black voices in the mainstream historical record. Reproductive Justice, the term originally coined by 16 Black women in the US suffered for many years from such under-representation even as it was adopted by three other communities of color during the 1990s in an attempt to draw attention to the human right to maintain personal bodily autonomy, have children, not have children, and parent the children we have in safe and sustainable communities. Attempts to realize this human right have been intentionally thwarted in US, Latin American and even African societies far before it was named. This course will investigate Black sexuality and attempts to use it throughout history to denigrate Black cultures with special attention to Black feminism and the fight to reclaim reproductive autonomy in cultures mired with racism and sexism.

Department Population and Family Health

Spring 2022: The Arab and Muslim Americas

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10723
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Bahia Munem

Migratory movements from the Middle East and North Africa into the Americas were precipitated by multiple and intersecting factors. This course will examine the historical and contemporary waves of Arab and Muslim migrants and refugees into the Americas. It will explore how empire, globalization, and war influenced and continue to influence the flow of people across borders and impact policies and ideas of belonging in receiving nation-states. We will examine Arab and Muslim identity in light of gendered, ethnoreligious, class, and national affiliations and investigate the racialization of Islam and the gendered-Orientalist constructions of Arabs and Muslims in the US and Latin America (Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, Chile). Utilizing interdisciplinary texts, we will trace the ways that specific diasporic subjects have been incorporated into host nation- states and analyze, through a comparative framework, the receptions and rejections of Arabs and Muslims in the US and Latin America.

Department of Ethnicity and Race, Center for

Spring 2022: World Literature Revisited II

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
00243
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
TR 4:10pm-5:25pm
Instructor: 
Atefeh Akbari Shahmirzadi

(Please note that you do not need to take ENGL BC3204 World Literature Revisited I and ENGL BC3205 World Literature Revisited II in sequence; you may take them in any order.) As a discipline, World Literature dates back to the early 19th century and Goethe’s concept of weltliteratur. Yet, despite the fact that Goethe was well-versed in the literature of the “Orient” and he emphasized their centrality in weltliteratur, the languages that he spoke of and underlined within the formation of this literature were mostly German and Romance languages. Institutionally speaking, not much has changed over the past couple of centuries. More often than not, studying the literature of locations such as the Middle East, Africa, or East Asia takes place in Area Studies departments, and offerings of these areas’ literatures in Comparative Literature departments are few and far in between.

In World Literature Revisited I, we imagined what a survey of World Literature in a literary studies department could look like, as we dealt with ancient texts until around the 14th century, with a focus on origin stories and epic narratives, lyric poetry, historical narratives, and sacred/religious texts. In World Literature Revisited II, we will continue to investigate and challenge the categories of “Eastern” and “Western” literature and think through the categories of “world” and “literature” in the course title. In this part of the course, we will work on (classical, early modern, and modern) drama, modern poetry, and the novel, with a particular focus on reading in comparison adaptations, appropriations, and literary responses. What/where/whom constitutes the world in World Literature? How can we read and trace literary influence across these literatures without reducing them to a mere repetition of the same themes and ideas? Finally, we will think about the role that translation plays in the production and politics of World Literature, particularly when it comes to adaptations and appropriations, and how the issue of translation differentiates between the disciplines of Comparative Literature and World Literature.

Department English @ Barnard


Political Science

Spring 2022: Contemporary African Politics

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12909
Points: 
3
Location: 
707 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
MW 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Kimuli Kasara

This course aims to teach students what, if any, answers social scientists have to the questions that concern anyone with an interest in African politics: 1) Why have democratic governments flourished in some countries and not others? 2) What institutions may enable Africans to hold their leaders accountable? 3) How do people participate in politics? 4) In what ways do aspiring African political leaders build public support? 5) To what extent does persistent poverty on the continent have political causes? and 6) Why is violence used to resolve some political disputes and not others?


SIPA Courses

Spring 2022: African Development Strategies

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10559
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Akbar Noman

This course focuses on economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa from a political economy perspective. It is divided into three sections. The first section examines the broad economic trends, policies and strategies of the past 50 years. The Washington Consensus and the lost decades are examined in some detail. The focus of this part is on economic growth and structural change, notably the controversies around economic policies and institutions. In the second section the course turns to socioeconomic dimensions and aspects of development including poverty, inequality, employment, health, education, and gender. The final section concludes with an examination of the implications of climate change, debates around foreign aid and an overview of what we have learned. Some readings are to be finalized.

Spring 2022: Arab Identity and Its Politics

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
18209
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
501a International Affairs Bldg
Day/Time: 
T 4:10pm - 6:00pm
Instructor: 
Safwan Masri

Cultural identity has become a potent force in global politics, even seemingly independent from the economic and geopolitical considerations that traditionally constitute the field of international political science. The Middle East and North Africa region exhibits a complex history of identity development through widespread proliferation of religion, Ottoman and Western European imperialism, and Arab renaissance and nationalist movements in the 19th and 20th centuries. But where does all of this leave the region today in terms of Arab identity and its politics? What can be learned from this particular context about how identity operates in global politics in the 21st century broadly conceived? Does the notion of a unified “Arabness” hold water socially, psychologically, or politically? The region’s social, cultural, religious, institutional, linguistic, and economic diversity would seem to complicate any notion of so-called Arab “unity.” This course will interrogate political interests caught up in modern-day Arab nationalism—both authoritarian governments and Western neo-Orientalists. What would the ramifications of moving past Arab identity be, not only for political actors in the West and postcolonial Arab regimes, but also for individuals’ sense of their own multi-layered selves? Who benefits from perpetuation and politicization of Arab identity—and who loses? Special focus will be placed on the regionalization and religionization of identity in an Israel/Palestine context, and the ramifications of these trends for Palestinian human rights claims. In short, the course will explore how identity politics has gone global and map the contours of its effects on regions, nations, and individual lives.

Spring 2022: Comparative Development: East Asia, Other

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16622
Points: 
3
Location: 
501B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Akbar Noman

This course will first, examine the nature, ingredients and gradations of the extraordinary success of several East Asian economies. The lessons of their experience have been the subject of an extensive literature. The course will introduce students to the main controversies. The second part will illuminate the debate by contrasting the experience and policies of East Asia with stylized trends and overviews of developments in each of the regions of Latin America, South Asia (Indian subcontinent), Sub-Saharan Africa and the transition economies of Europe and Central Asia. These comparisons will be informed by the question of what the lessons of East Asian success are for these other regions.

Spring 2022: Failures and Successes of Three Decades of Peacemaking

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14330
Points: 
3
Location: 
801 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
M 11:00am - 12:50pm
Instructor: 
Jean-Marie Guehenno

The return to power of the Taliban in Afghanistan, coming after a twenty years engagement of the international community, raises hard questions on the wisdom of intervening in the lives of others. At the same time, the wars in Syria and Yemen, in which there was no intervention, have generated immense humanitarian crises, while the short but decisive intervention in Libya, once trumpeted as an example of the responsibility to protect, has led to a decade of political crisis. Have we learned the right lessons from the crises of the 90’s (Somalia, Bosnia, Rwanda…)? Or has the world changed so radically that the lessons of the 90’s no longer apply? At a time when geopolitical confrontation is deepening, is there still a space for intervention? Are there new lessons that we should learn from the last two decades? To answer those questions, we will go through several case studies – with a focus on conflicts in which the United Nations have been involved-, not only to better understand the causes of failure, and in some cases of success, but also to sharpen a definition of what can be called success. I will draw on my own experience as under-secretary-general for peacekeeping, as deputy of Kofi Annan when he tried to stop the Syrian conflict, and as chair of the board of the Centre for Humanitarian Dialogue and CEO of the International Crisis Group. I will also call on a few experts and practitioners with specific experience of particular conflicts. In the end, we will test our understanding of the causes of success and failure on two ongoing crises, Afghanistan and Syria, trying to identify the inflection points that have led to the present state of affairs, and what could/should have been done differently.

Spring 2022: Gender-Based Violence against Women

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14517
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
R 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Susana Martinez Restrepo

Description It is estimated that Gender-Based Violence (GBV) affects one-third of all women during their lifetime. GBV affects women’s health, mental health, labor market outcomes, and their overall wellbeing. GBV also increases the costs of health services, affects labor productivity outputs, and creates the need for additional counseling and psychological services. Can supporting women’s empowerment, reducing gender disparities, promoting positive masculinities, and changing norms and attitudes which foster violence help to end GBV? And, what have we learned about good practices that can be mobilized to attain these ends? This course focuses on four areas: legal and institutional reform, health, education and economic empowerment. In each, we will identify good practices as well as unintended consequences and shortcomings of interventions and policies implemented by governments, the private sector, NGOs, and grass roots organizations in South Asian, African and Latin American countries. By the end of this course students will be able to critically analyze and provide advice on interventions and policies aimed at preventing GBV and addressing the needs of survivors.

Spring 2022: Impact Measurement & Evaluation for Sustainable Development

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
17412
Points: 
3
Location: 
501A International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Veronica M. Olazabal

In a world driving towards the Sustainable Development Goals by 2030, the measurement and evaluation (M&E) toolkit is critical for holding governments, philanthropies, impact investors and others accountable for creating benefit, preventing harm and contributing to effective solutions. During this course, we will explore both the demand and supply side of generating data and evidence for decision-making in the 21st century. We will also learn practical M&E skills that can be applied across all professions and thematic sectors and that are tailored to meet the needs of diverse stakeholders. Finally, we will ground-truth concepts and theories through discussions with experts and practitioners as well as place-based use cases (primarily from Asia and Africa) of the challenges and opportunities in measuring and evaluating impact. Students can expect to develop the critical skills needed to ensure they are able to navigate, negotiate and facilitate their way to a quality measurement and evaluation plan.

Spring 2022: Peacebuilding After Mass Violence

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10597
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm, S 10:00am-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Severine Autesserre

How can we build peace in the aftermath of extensive violence? How can international actors help in this process? This seminar focuses on international peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding efforts in recent conflicts. It adopts a critical, social science approach to the topic of building peace (it is not a class on how to design and implement peacebuilding programs, but rather a class on how to think about such initiatives). It covers general concepts, theories, and debates, as well as specific cases of peacebuilding successes and failures. Throughout the course, students will acquire a broad understanding of the concepts, theoretical traditions, and debates in the study of peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding. The course also will introduce students to new issues in the field, such as the micro-foundations of peace settlements, the importance of local perceptions, and the attention to the everyday in the study of conflict-resolution. Furthermore, by the end of the semester, students should have an in-depth understanding of some of the most salient peace processes in recent years, including those in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, and the former Yugoslavia. Interested students should join the waitlist and make sure that they attend the first class meeting.

Spring 2022: Politics of Modern Middle Eastern Art

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14368
Points: 
3
Location: 
402 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
R 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Sultan Soound Al-Qassemi

In this course, we shall survey the political underpinnings of Arab art in the 20th century, and the socio-political conditions that shaped cultural production in the region. Whether it is under the Baathist regimes of Syria and Iraq or under Egypt’s pan-Arabism championed by Gamal Abdel Nasser, painting and sculpture in addition to film and performance have been employed by various governments as a tool of soft power to propagate their policies to the public not only in their respective states but throughout the region and beyond. Despite this widespread government patronage of the arts, many artists have chosen to challenge their authorities through subversive movements and practices, which we will address at different moments in the semester. This course, through its focus on creative practices and strategic use of the arts, will attempt to shed light on an often neglected dimension of the modern history of the Arab World and other parts of the Middle East.

Spring 2022: Security Council and Peacekeeping in Africa

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16626
Points: 
3
Location: 
402B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 11:00am - 12:50pm
Instructor: 
Elisabeth Lindenmayer

This course, which will be taught by a practitioner, will focus on United Nations peacekeeping operations as one of the main conflict management tools of the Security Council (SC) in Africa. Through an extensive series of case studies (Somalia, Rwanda, South Sudan, Libya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, the Central African Republic and Cote d'Ivoire), It will closely examine the tool of peace keeping, the context in which it operates, the evolution of its doctrine, the lessons learned, and the challenges ahead. Drawing on the recent report of the High-level Independent Panel on peace operations (HIPPO), and the cases studies above, it will elaborate on the many issues in peacekeeping today,in particular the limits of the use of force, the protection of civilians, the nexus peacekeeping/peacebuilding, and the increased partnership with regional and subregional organizations.

Spring 2022: Sino-African Relations in History and Pr.

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
17410
Points: 
3
Location: 
501A International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Yuan Wang

Since the 2000s, China-Africa diplomatic and economic relations have accelerated rapidly; however, links between them are not new. Since pre-colonial times, there have been flows of people, goods, and ideas; at times more intense than others. In recent years, China and Africa have renewed their relations at many different levels. From political engagement to increased trade and economic relations, and perhaps more importantly, to increased contact between ordinary Africans and Chinese. What are the implications of contemporary Sino-African engagements? Is China’s economic activities in Africa representing a ‘new scramble for Africa’ and China’s ‘neo-imperialism?’ What are the differences between Chinese and Western approach in Africa? How to understand African agency in the continent’s asymmetric relationship with global powers? Is China a development model for Africa? Are Chinese people racist? How much soft power does China have in Africa?
This course explores both historical and contemporary linkages between Africa and China in political and macro-economic realm, as well as socio-cultural aspects. This course invites students to see how various interests impact the ways in which ‘China-Africa’ is framed; and to explore these engagements by sector, by individual African country, and vis-à-vis concerns about racism, labour issues, and China’s increasing environmental footprint in Africa. This course aims for students to develop and understanding of not only China’s impact on Africa, but also how African actors actively shape their relations with China as well as with other global powers.

Spring 2022: Social Movements & Citizenship in Africa

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14921
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
M 11:00am-12:50pm
Instructor: 
Jinny K. Prais

This course focuses on social movements and citizenship in sub-Saharan Africa to examine how people form political and social movements and deploy citizenship strategies within social, historical, and economic structures that are both local and global. It draws on readings and lectures from scholars in history, political science, anthropology, sociology, and African studies to explore the following topics and themes: histories and theories of social movements and citizenship; cities and social movements and citizenship; citizenship outside the nation-state; social movements and democracy; citizenship as a creative enterprise that emphasizes claim-making and improvisation; citizenship within imperial, international, and national contexts; infrastructures, claim-making, and coalition building; opposition, leadership and democracy; and social movements of African youth and women. This course features guest lectures by and discussions with French and American scholars from Sciences-Po, Universite Paris 1, NYU, and Columbia, and is part of the Joint African Studies Program (JASP) at the Institute of African Studies that is supported by the Partnership University Fund (PUF) and the French Alliance Program at Columbia. It includes foundational readings on concepts, theories, and histories of social movements and citizenship in Africa as well as in-depth case studies on selective themes by various experts working on sub-Saharan Africa. It is unique insofar as it offers a strong foundation in social movements and citizenship while exposing students to in-depth case studies by leading experts working in a variety of disciplines and geographical contexts. All lectures and discussions are conducted in English.

Spring 2022: The European Union and Human Rights

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10611
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
801 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
US 10:00am - 4:00pm
Instructor: 
Jan Wouters

The European Union (EU) has a deep and broad commitment to the respect and promotion of human rights, both in its internal and its external policies. However, it often faces difficulties in living up to this commitment. In this course we will study the EU’s commitment to human rights as outlined in its founding Treaties, the role of its institutional actors in following up on this commitment, and the EU’s internal and external actions and policies in this respect. For the EU’s internal policies we will focus in particular on its non-discrimination policies as well as its migration policy. In the area of the EU’s external relations we will explore the role of human rights in the EU’s development cooperation, trade policy and humanitarian aid, as well as in the EU’s multilateral relations with other international organizations, both global (e.g. the United Nations) and regional (e.g. Organization of American States; African Union; Council of Europe; OSCE).

Spring 2022: Universal Food Security

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10653
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
T 9:00am-10:50am
Instructor: 
Glenn Denning

This course addresses the challenges and opportunities for achieving a productive, profitable, inclusive, healthy, sustainable, resilient, and ethical global food system. Our first class will provide a brief historical perspective of the global food system, highlighting relevant developments over the past 10,000 years and will explain key concepts, critical challenges, and opportunities ahead. For the ensuing few weeks, we will cover the core biophysical requirements for food production: soil and land, water and climate, and genetic resources. We include an introduction to human nutrition – Nutrition Week – that focuses on dietary change and food-based solutions to malnutrition. Building on this, the course will survey a selection of important food systems and trends across Asia, Africa, and Latin America that provide food security and livelihoods for more than half of the world’s population. Case studies and classroom debates throughout the course will explore the roles of science, technology, policies, politics, institutions, business, finance, aid, trade, and human behavior in advancing sustainable agriculture, and achieving food and nutritional security. We will probe the interactions of food systems with global issues including poverty and inequality, the persistence of chronic hunger and malnutrition, climate change, environmental degradation, international food business and value chains, biotechnology (GMOs), post-harvest losses, and food waste. With a sharp eye for credible evidence, we will confront controversies, reflect on historical trends, identify common myths, and surface little-known but important truths about agriculture and food systems. In our final sessions, we address the ultimate question: can we feed and nourish the world without wrecking it for future generations?


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