Institute of African Studies - Columbia University

Courses

African Language Courses

Fall 2015: ADV ANCIENT EGYPTIAN I

Egyptian W1201
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
14616
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
Ogden Goelet; Stephane A Charitos

Corequisites: EGYP W1101-W1102 or the instructor's permission. Advanced readings in ancient Egyptian texts.

Fall 2015: ARABIC ADVANCED GRAMMAR REVIEW

Middle East W4216
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
28082
Points: 
3
Location: 
112 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
TR 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Fall 2015: ARABIC FOR HERITAGE SPEAKERS I

Middle East W1208
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
72988
Points: 
5
Location: 
112 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
Youssef Nouhi

REQ INSTR PERM AND PLACEMENT EXAM. REFER TO MESAAS WEBSITE

Fall 2015: ARABIC I FIRST YEAR

Middle East W1210
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
62849
Points: 
5
Location: 
104 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Reem Faraj

PLEASE REFER TO DEPT WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION GUIDE-LINE

Fall 2015: ARABIC I FIRST YEAR

Middle East W1210
Section: 
002
Call Number: 
62959
Points: 
5
Location: 
104 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Reem Faraj

PLEASE REFER TO DEPT WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION GUIDE-LINE

Fall 2015: ARABIC I FIRST YEAR

Middle East W1210
Section: 
003
Call Number: 
62531
Points: 
5
Location: 
114 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
May Ahmar

PLEASE REFER TO DEPT WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION GUIDE-LINE

Fall 2015: ARABIC I FIRST YEAR

Middle East W1210
Section: 
004
Call Number: 
66558
Points: 
5
Location: 
114 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 2:40pm-3:45pm
Instructor: 
Faris Al Ahmad

PLEASE REFER TO DEPT WEBSITE FOR REGISTRATION GUIDE-LINE

Fall 2015: ARABIC I FOURTH YEAR MODERN

Middle East W4212
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10709
Points: 
4
Location: 
6C KRAFT CENTER
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Taoufik Ben-Amor

Fall 2015: ARABIC I SECOND YEAR

Middle East W1214
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16700
Points: 
5
Location: 
101 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Abeer Shaheen

REQUIRES INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION

Fall 2015: ARABIC I SECOND YEAR

Middle East W1214
Section: 
002
Call Number: 
18492
Points: 
5
Location: 
103 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 11:40am-12:45pm
Instructor: 
Faris Al Ahmad

REQUIRES INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION

Fall 2015: ARABIC I SECOND YEAR

Middle East W1214
Section: 
003
Call Number: 
18492
Points: 
5
Location: 
101 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 4:10pm-5:15pm
Instructor: 
Tarik Belhoussein

REQUIRES INSTRUCTOR'S PERMISSION

Fall 2015: ARABIC I THIRD YEAR

Middle East W4210
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
12543
Points: 
5
Location: 
114 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 8:50am-9:55am
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

Fall 2015: ARABIC I THIRD YEAR

Middle East W4210
Section: 
002
Call Number: 
28531
Points: 
5
Location: 
112 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Ouijdane Absi

THIS SECTION IS READING INTENSIVE.

Fall 2015: ARABIC II FIRST YEAR

Middle East W1211
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21971
Points: 
5
Location: 
116 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:15am
Instructor: 
Abeer Shaheen

Fall 2015: ARABIC II SECOND YEAR

Middle East W1215
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
11674
Points: 
5
Location: 
101 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
MTWR 2:40pm-3:45pm
Instructor: 
Tarik Belhoussein

Fall 2015: SWAHILI I ADVANCED

Swahili W3335
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
24240
Points: 
4
Location: 
414 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
TR 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Fall 2015: SWAHILI I ELEMENTARY

Swahili W1101
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
17200
Points: 
4
Location: 
254 International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MTWR 9:10am-10:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Fall 2015: SWAHILI I ELEMENTARY

Swahili W1101
Section: 
002
Call Number: 
74226
Points: 
4
Location: 
114 Knox Hall
Day/Time: 
TR 6:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Jane N Clayton

Fall 2015: SWAHILI I INTERMEDIATE

Swahili W1201
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
15174
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWR 10:10am-11:00am
Instructor: 
Abdul Nanji

Fall 2015: WOLOF I ADVANCED

Wolof W3331
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
63988
Points: 
4
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Fall 2015: WOLOF I ELEMENTARY

Wolof W1101
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
25430
Points: 
4
Location: 
352B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MWTR 12:00pm-12:50pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Fall 2015: WOLOF I INTERMEDIATE

Wolof W1201
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
76197
Points: 
4
Location: 
351A International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MW 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mariame S Sy

Fall 2015: ZULU I ELEMENTARY

Zulu W1101
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
16318
Points: 
4
Location: 
351C International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
MTWRF 11:35am-12:25pm
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh

Fall 2015: ZULU I INTERMEDIATE

Zulu W1201
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
27544
Points: 
4
Location: 
TBA
Day/Time: 
MTWRF 10:30am-11:20am
Instructor: 
Sandra Sanneh

SHARED COURSE. CONTACT SSW2117@COLUMBIA.EDU FOR INFO


Africana Studies

Fall 2015: Human Rights and Social Change in Sub-Saharan Africa

Africana Studies BC3560
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
08422
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
T 9:00am-10:50am
Instructor: 
J. Paul Martin

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Examines the evolution of the ideas, institutions and practices associated with social justice in Africa and their relationship to contemporary international human rights movement and focuses on the role of human rights in social change. A number of themes will re-occur throughout the course, notably tensions between norms and reality, cultural diversity, economic and political asymmetries, the role of external actors, and women as rights providers. Countries of special interest include Liberia, Senegal, South African and Tanzania.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Introduction to African Studies

Africana Studies BC2004
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
02457
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
MW 11:40am-12:55pm
Instructor: 
Abosede A. George

Interdisciplinary and thematic approach to the study of Africa, moving from pre-colonial through colonial and post-colonial periods to contemporary Africa. Focus will be on its history, societal relations, politics and the arts. The objective is to provide a critical survey of the history as well as the continuing debates in African Studies.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Politics of Gender in Contemporary South Africa

Africana Studies BC3001
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
08334
Points: 
1.5
Location: 
409 Barnard Hall
Day/Time: 
WF 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Yvette Christianse

This module is designed to offer mid-senior level students with an interest in African Studies an intensive engagement with the politics of gender and sexualities in specific African contexts of the c21. Although the module will include discussion of aspects of the sexual and gendered operations of colonial praxis, the concentration will be on the ways in which post-flag democracy cultures have taken up the question of gender and sexualities. We will explore debates on the representation and realities of lesbian and transgendered experiences, the meaning of race-based identity-politics within “new” democracies, the narratives of “the body” as they emerge through medical and religious discourses on “women,”  and discourses of “e-masculinization” and militarism.     Note that this course will only run from September 23rd through October 9th.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Writing Diasporic Cities

Africana Studies BC3065
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
04111
Points: 
4
Location: 
201 Lehman Hall (Barnard)
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Yvette Christianse

This course considers representation of four cities in which diasporic communities have settled and negotiated the psychic and material terrain that stretches from a past homeland to a settled homeland.  We look at New York, London, Kinshasha, and Cape Town where communities of different African diasporas- historical and contemporary- as well as South Asian diasporas have settled.   Locally, we enter a space like the contemporary Malcolm Shabazz market to attend to the transnational, mercantilist as well as cultural public spheres that it creates.  We also look at earlier transmigrations by African Diasporic groups moving from Jamaica to Harlem to Marseilles.  We consider London in the 1980s and the early 2000s.   Thematically, we consider different kinds of displacement and their impact upon women.  We foreground race, ethnicity, nationalist discourses, global economies, and the publishing, distribution and marketing networks of the Arts produced in these cities.  We read across genres and consider graffiti in neighborhoods that have diasporic communities.

Go to CU Directory of Classes


Anthropology

Fall 2015: Anticolonialism

Anthropology V3921
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
83531
Points: 
4
Location: 
963 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Day/Time: 
T 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
David Scott

Through a careful exploration of the argument and style of five vivid anticolonial texts, Mahatma Gandhi's Hind Swaraj, C.L.R. James' The Black Jacobins, Aimé Césaire's Discourse on Colonialism, Albert Memmi's Colonizer and Colonized, and Frantz Fanon's The Wretched of the Earth, this course aims to inquire into the construction of the image of colonialism and its projected aftermaths established in anti-colonial discourse.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Major Debates in the Study of Africa

Middle East W2030
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
64824
Points: 
4
Location: 
413 Kent Hall
Day/Time: 
MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Mahmood Mamdani

This course will focus on key debates that have shaped the study of Africa in the post-colonial African academy. We will cover seven key debates: (1) Historiography; (2) Slavery and slave trades; (3) State Formation; (4) Colonialism; (5) Underdevelopment; (6) Nationalism and the anti-colonial struggle; (7) Political Identity and political violence in the post-colony.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: The Modern State and the Colonial Subject

Anthropology: Middle East G6406
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
73884
Points: 
3
Location: 
963 EXT Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Day/Time: 
T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Mahmood Mamdani

Prerequisites: the instructor's permission. On the development of legal thought on the colonial subject. Focus on the American Indian in the New World, and subjugated peoples in the Ottoman Empire, in British India and in tropical and southern Africa.

Go to CU Directory of Classes


Art History

Fall 2015: "Primitivism" - From Europe to Africa and Back Again

Art History G8080
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
70890
Points: 
4
Location: 
930 Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Zoe S Strother

Is Jean-Loup Amselle correct in arguing that primitivism "lies at the core of postmodernity"? This seminar examines the legacy of several generations of European "primitivism" for contemporary artistic practice in Africa. For example, we will closely analyze Picasso's relationship with African art but also how artists and critics in Senegal, Congo, and Tanzania have responded to Picasso. Case studies include: Gauguin; Carl Einstein; Kandinsky & Russian primitivism; blackface minstrelsy as it travels from the U.S. to Ghana; Leni Riefenstahl; Senegalese Negritude; and a selection of prominent exhibitions.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Ethiopian Art in Global Networks

Art History W3805
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
84783
Points: 
4
Location: 
930 Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Day/Time: 
M 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Zoe S. Strother

Ethiopia has fired the imagination for centuries as the home of Prester John, Queen of Sheba and the Ark of the Covenant, the Books of Enoch and Jubilees, a special dispensation from Prophet Mohammed in the Hadith and as the one African nation state to escape colonialism through defeat of Italy at the Battle of Adwa in 1896. This course examines the fascinating history and history of representations of Ethiopia in relation to its rich visual culture with special sensitivity to past and present networks of exchange with Byzantium, Jerusalem and Palestine, the Mediterranean, South Arabia, and India. There will be units on the burial complexes of the ancient state of Aksum, rock cut churches of Lalibela, illuminated manuscripts (both Christian and Muslim), and modernism. Students will be encouraged to take advantage of New York collections for their research projects. (Graduate students and students outside of art history are welcome to apply; they should contact the professor directly.)

Go to CU Directory of Classes


English and Comparative Literature

Fall 2015: Literature and Oil

Comparative Literature: English W3937
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
76779
Points: 
4
Location: 
408 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Jennifer Wenzel

(Seminar). This course will investigate the connections between literary/cultural production and petroleum as the substance that makes possible the world as we know it, both as an energy source and a component in the manufacture of everything from food to plastic. Our current awareness of oil's scarcity and its myriad costs (whether environmental, political, or social) provides a lens to read for the presence (or absence) of oil in texts in a variety of genres and national traditions. As we begin to imagine a world "beyond petroleum," we will confront ways in which oil shapes both the world we know and how we imagine the world. Oil will feature in questions of theme (texts about "oil"), of literary form (are there common formal conventions of an "oil novel"?), of interpretive method (how to read for oil), of transnational circulation (how does "foreign oil" link US citizens to other spaces?), and of the materiality (or "oiliness") of literary culture (how does the production and circulation of texts, whether print or digital, rely on oil?). Application instructions: E-mail Professor Jennifer Wenzel (jw2497@columbia.edu) with the subject heading "Literature and Oil seminar." In your message, include basic information: your name, school, major, year of study, and relevant courses taken, along with a brief statement about why you are interested in taking the course. Admitted students should register for the course; they will automatically be placed on a wait list from which the instructor will in due course admit them as spaces become available.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Narrative and Human Rights

Comparative Literature: English W4550
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
10312
Points: 
3
Location: 
614 Schermerhorn Hall [SCH]
Day/Time: 
MW 6:10pm-7:25pm
Instructor: 
Joseph R Slaughter

(Lecture). We can't talk about human rights without talking about the forms in which we talk about human rights. This course will study the convergences of the thematics, philosophies, politics, practices, and formal properties of literature and human rights. In particular, it will examine how literary questions of narrative shape (and are shaped by) human rights concerns; how do the forms of stories enable and respond to forms of thought, forms of commitment, forms of being, forms of justice, and forms of violation? How does narrative help us to imagine an international order based on human dignity, rights, and equality? We will read classic literary texts and contemporary writing (both literary and non-literary) and view a number of films and other multimedia projects to think about the relationships between story forms and human rights problematics and practices. Likely literary authors: Roberto Bolaño, Miguel de Cervantes, Assia Djebar, Ariel Dorfman, Slavenka Drakulic, Nuruddin Farah, Janette Turner Hospital, Franz Kafka, Sahar Kalifeh, Sindiwe Magona, Maniza Naqvi, Michael Ondaatje, Alicia Partnoy, Ousmane Sembène, Mark Twain . . . . We will also read theoretical and historical pieces by authors such as Agamben, An-Na'im, Appiah, Arendt, Balibar, Bloch, Chakrabarty, Derrida, Douzinas, Habermas, Harlow, Ignatieff, Laclau and Mouffe, Levinas, Lyotard, Marx, Mutua, Nussbaum, Rorty, Said, Scarry, Soyinka, Spivak, Williams.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Post-Colonial Theory

Comparative Literature: English G6905
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21533
Points: 
4
Location: 
612 Philosophy Hall
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Joseph R Slaughter

Fall 2015: The Novel in Africa

Middle East W4122
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
67297
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Jennifer Wenzel

The main task of this course will be to read novels by African writers. But "the novel in Africa" also involves connections between the literary genre of the novel and the historical processes of colonialism, decolonization, and globalization in Africa. One important question we'll consider is how African novels depict those historical experiences in their themes and plots—we'll read novels that are "about" colonialism, etc. A more complex question is how these historical processes relate to the emergence of the novel as an important genre for African writers. Edward Said went so far as to say that without imperialism, there would be no European novel as we know it. How can we understand the novel in Africa (whether read or written) as a product of the colonial encounter? How did it shape the process of decolonization? What contribution to history, whether literary or political, does the novel in Africa make? We'll undertake a historical survey of African novels from the 1930s to the present, with attention to various subgenres (village novel, war novel, urbanization novel, novel of postcolonial disillusion, Bildungsroman). We'll attend to how African novelists blend literate and oral storytelling traditions, how they address their work to local and global audiences, and how they use scenes of characters reading novels (whether African or European) in order to position their writing within national, continental, and world literary space.

Go to CU Directory of Classes


French Courses

Fall 2015: Africa in Cinema

French BC3073
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
07041
Points: 
3
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-8:00pm
Instructor: 
Kaiama L. Glover

Considerations of African-directed twentieth century films concerning French-speaking, sub-Saharan West Africa. Reflections on tradition and modernity, politics and popular culture, the status of women, youth problems, identity construction. Placement of African film within its own tradition. Class taught in English.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: African Lit. and Philosophy: Negritude and Poetry

French G8618
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
69378
Points: 
3
Location: 
507 Philosophy Hall
Day/Time: 
W 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Bachir Diagne

The course will be the study of the poetic and cultural movement known as "negritude" initiated in the late 1930's by Senghor, from Senegal, Cesaire,from Martinique and Damas from Guyana. In particular Senghor and Cesaire's theoretical texts on the philosophy of negritude will be studied along with their poetry but also the works of other francophone writers associated with the movement: Birago Diop and Cheikh Hamidou Kane.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Francophone Noir

Comparative Literature: French W3815
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
79032
Points: 
3
Location: 
407 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
MW 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Madeleine Dobie

France has a long and influential history of crime/detective writing, as the use of  ‘noir' as a loan word in other languages attests. Though noir literature and film waned in importance after its heyday in the 1950s, it has lately made a comeback, not only in France but also in former French colonies in Africa and the Caribbean where French remains an important language of cultural production. In these contexts, crime writing often explores the terrain of social and political injustice and inequality, particularly postcolonial, racial and transnational dynamics. Enquiries into the repressed memory of state-sponsored violence, notably the memory of the Holocaust and colonial brutality, these narratives harness the familiar mood, characters and structure of the crime genre, while giving it a local inscription. In this course we read contemporary crime fiction from France and Africa/the Middle East, considering how texts respond to local social and political circumstances and play with the conventions of the genre. We devote particular attention to Algeria, where crime writing has emerged as a preeminent genre in the wake of the acute yet still murky violence of the 1990s, a conflict aptly, if rather crudely, described by Adam Schatz as "one big murder mystery." We also explore some of the principal critical debates associated with detective fiction, including theories about genre and about high and low culture, and readings that situate crime writing in light of questions of international justice, punishment and human rights.  The course is taught in English. Readings can be done in French or English (all of the novels included on the syllabus are available in translation), and papers may also be submitted in either language.  

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Introduction to Francophone Studies

French W3420
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
62024
Points: 
3
Location: 
507 Philosophy Hall
Day/Time: 
MW 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Madeleine Dobie

Prerequisites: FREN W3405 Advanced Grammar and Composition or an AP score of 5 or the director of undergraduate studies' permission. Examines conceptions of culture and civilization in France from the Enlightenment to the Exposition Coloniale of 1931, with an emphasis on the historical development and ideological foundations of French colonialism. Authors and texts include: the Encyclopédie; the Déclaration des droits de l'homme et du citoyen; the Code noir; Diderot; Chateaubriand; Tocqueville; Claire de Duras; Renan; Gobineau; Gauguin; Drumont.

Go to CU Directory of Classes


History Courses

Fall 2015: A History of African Cities

Middle East W3915
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
23021
Points: 
3
Location: 
501B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
T 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Mamadou Diouf

This seminar offers an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the history of African cities. It cuts across disciplinary boundaries of history, geography, anthropology, political and cultural sociology, literature and cultural studies, to explore the vaious trajectories of urbanization on the continent.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: African Civilizations

African Civilization C1020
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
21194
Points: 
4
Location: 
402 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
TR 12:10pm-2:00pm
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: African Civilizations

African Civilization C1020
Section: 
002
Call Number: 
29586
Points: 
4
Location: 
607 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
MW 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Samuel F Daly

This course provides a general introduction to some of the key intellectual debates in Africa by Africans through primary sources, including scholarly works, political tracts, fiction, art, and film. Beginning with an exploration of African notions of spiritual and philosophical uniqueness and ending with contemporary debates on the meaning and historical viability of an African Renaissance, this course explores the meanings of ‘Africa' and ‘being African.' Field(s): AFR*

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Empires and Cultures of the Atlantic World

History W3160
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
87781
Points: 
3
Location: 
411 Fayerweather
Day/Time: 
TR 10:10am-11:25am
Instructor: 
Bronwen C McShea

This course follows interconnected historical developments in Western Europe, the Americas, and West Africa from the late fifteenth through early nineteenth century. It highlights both the comparative, structural evolutions of European colonial empires and the cultural experiences and perspectives of Atlantic World inhabitants, including soldiers, merchants, slaves, missionaries, and revolutionaries.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Gender, Sexuality, and Power from Colonial to Contemporary Africa

History BC4788
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
02510
Points: 
4
Location: 
To be announced
Day/Time: 
M 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Abosede A. George

This course deals with the scholarship on gender and sexuality in African history. The central themes of the course will be changes and continuities in gender performance and the politics of gender and sexual difference within African societies, the social, political, and economic processes that have influenced gender and sexual identities, and the connections between gender, sexuality, inequality, and activism at local, national, continental, and global scales.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Health and Healing in African History

History W4769
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
17071
Points: 
4
Location: 
501A International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 10:10am-12:00pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

This course charts the history of health and healing from, as far as is possible, a perspective interior to Africa. It explores changing practices and understandings of disease, etiology, healing and well-being from pre-colonial times through into the post-colonial. A major theme running throughout the course is the relationship between medicine, the body, power and social groups. This is balanced by an examination of the creative ways in which Africans have struggled to compose healthy communities, albeit with varied success, whether in the fifteenth century or the twenty-first. Field(s): AFR

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: History of East Africa: 1850 - present

History W3764
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
17552
Points: 
3
Location: 
516 Hamilton Hall
Day/Time: 
TR 2:40pm-3:55pm
Instructor: 
Rhiannon Stephens

A survey of East African history over the past two millennia with a focus on political and social change. Themes include early religious and political ideas, the rise of states on the Swahili coast and between the Great Lakes, slavery, colonialism, and social and cultural developments in the 20th century.  This course fulfills the Global Core requirement. Field(s): AFR

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Research Seminar in African History

History G9761
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
13121
Points: 
4
Location: 
311 Fayerweather
Day/Time: 
W 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

International Affairs

Fall 2015: African Institutions in a Changing Regional & Global Security Environment

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
U6161
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
John Hirsch

The course will analyze the current political context - the opportunities as well as the constraints - facing the African Union and the Regional Economic Communities (RECs). We will examine key challenges facing African institutions and leaders including developing the tools for good governance, dealing with the illegal exploitation of natural resources, conflict resolution, protection of human rights, and strengthening humanitarian response (e.g. protection of women and children in conflict zones). African states have the potential to benefit from globalization but are also challenged by both old and new global trading patterns from which in many areas they are still marginalized. Recognizing and overcoming these constraints represents a major challenge for Africa's leaders and civil society representatives as well as their external partners - the United Nations, the European Union, and major bilateral donors.

Not offered during the 2015-2016 Academic year.

Fall 2015: Humanitarian Crisis-East Congo

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
U6497
Points: 
1
Instructor: 
Dennis Dijkzeul

Over the past decade, perhaps no area of the world has seen such violent transformations and complex conflicts as Africa's Great Lakes Region. This 1-credit course focuses on the conflicts and humanitarian assistance in two Eastern Congolese provinces, Kivu Sud and Kivu Nord. Extrapolations based on IRC studies estimate an excess mortality in Eastern DR Congo of over 4 million people out of a total population of about 20 million over the last ten years. The neighboring countries of Eastern Congo, Rwanda, Burundi, and Uganda all play a role in this conflict. Moreover, they have also endured their own forms of traumatic upheaval and are still searching for a form of stability. This course asks why these conflicts endured for so long? What are the root causes? What happens when a state bureaucracy breaks down? What happens to the health care and educational systems? Can solutions be found? What is the role of the humanitarian organizations vis-à-vis the local population, civil society, and the local administration? The first part of the course gives an historical overview of the crises, and explains the current political situation, including forms of violence, exploitation, abuse and coping in the broader context of conflict in the Great Lakes region. The second part talks about the (limited) role of the humanitarian organizations, it especially focuses on problems in the areas of health and, to a lesser extent, education. Finally, this part will also look at some future scenarios. The course is based on Dennis Dijkzeul's research in Eastern Congo. The overall aim of the course is to help students to understand the situation in Eastern Congo and how humanitarian organizations intervene. Offered in the Spring.

Fall 2015: Political Economy of African Development

International Affairs U6163
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
67195
Points: 
3
Location: 
501B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
R 2:10pm-4:00pm
Instructor: 
Akbar Noman

Category: EPD, Regional

This course focuses on economic development in Sub-Saharan Africa from a political economy perspective. It is divided into three sections. The first section examines the broad economic trends, policies and strategies of the past 50 years. The Washington Consensus and the "lost decades" are examined in some detail. The focus of this part is on economic growth and structural change, notably the controversies around economic policies and institutions. In the second section the course turns to socioeconomic dimensions and aspects of development including poverty, inequality, employment, health, education, and gender. The final section concludes with an examination of the implications of climate change, debates around foreign aid and an overview of what we have learned. Some readings are to be finalized.

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Political Economy of Development

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
INAF 6164
Points: 
3
Instructor: 
Christopher Blattman

This course tackles the big questions and theories in development through the case of sub-Saharan Africa. We compare development patterns within Africa, but understand the continent (and the process of development) by comparing it to the Americas, Asia, and (to some extent) the development of the West. Restricted to EPD (Economic and Political Development) concentration students. Offered in the Spring.

Fall 2015: The Security Council and Peacekeeping in Africa in the 21st Century

International Affairs U8507
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
71500
Points: 
3
Location: 
402B International Affairs Building
Day/Time: 
W 11:00am-12:50pm
Instructor: 
Elisabeth Lindenmayer

Category: MIA Core: Interstate Relations, EPD, HRHP, ISP, ICR, IO, Regional

This course, which will be taught by a practitioner, will focus on United Nations peacekeeping operations as one of the main conflict management tools of the Security Council (SC) in Africa. Through an extensive series of case studies (Somalia, Rwanda, South Sudan, Libya, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, the Central African Republic and Cote d'Ivoire), It will closely examine the tool of peace keeping, the context in which it operates, the evolution of its doctrine, the lessons learned, and the challenges ahead. Drawing on the recent report of the High-level Independent Panel on peace operations (HIPPO), and the cases studies above, it will elaborate on the many issues in peacekeeping today,in particular the limits of the use of force, the protection of civilians, the nexus peacekeeping/peacebuilding, and the increased partnership with regional and subregional organizations.

Go to CU Directory of Classes


Law

Fall 2015: African Legal Theory, Law and Development

L6211
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
71999
Points: 
3
Location: 
TBD
Day/Time: 
T 4:20pm-7:10pm
Instructor: 
Francis Ssekandi

This course is structured around five main themes and is intended to explore the theoretical basis of existing African Laws and Legal Systems; their structure, content and future. The themes selected for this study are; 1. African Constitutionalism - law and theory; 2. Judicial jurisprudence; 3. Statutory Legal Reforms; 4. Transitional Justice and 5. Law and Development.

This is a study of foreign law using the tools of comparative legal analysis to acquire knowledge of how the laws and institutions in other jurisdictions adopt and apply the law to resolve intractable human rights and other issues.


Political Science

Fall 2015: Civil Wars and International Interventions in Africa

Political Science V3604
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
05076
Points: 
4
Location: 
405 Milbank Hall (Barnard)
Day/Time: 
TR 1:10pm-2:25pm
Instructor: 
Severine Autesserre

International Relations At least sophomore standing. Limited to 70 students. L-course sign-up. Barnard syllabus. This course counts as an introductory course for International Relations or Comparative Politics. Analyzes the causes of violence in civil wars. Examines the debates around emergency aid, peacekeeping and peacebuilding. Focuses on recent conflict situations in Africa -- especially Congo, Sudan, and Rwanda -- as a background against which to understand the distinct dynamics of violence, peace, and international interventions in civil conflicts. (Cross-listed by the Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race and both of Barnard's Human Rights and Africana Studies programs.)

Go to CU Directory of Classes

Fall 2015: Colloquium on Aid, Politics & Violence in Africa

Political Science BC3810
Section: 
4
Call Number: 
03818
Points: 
4
Location: 
201 Lehman Hall (Barnard)
Day/Time: 
T 4:10pm-6:00pm
Instructor: 
Severine Autesserre

International Relations Prerequisites: POLS V1601 or the equivalent. Admission by application through the Barnard department only. Enrollment limited to 16 students. Barnard syllabus. Explores the concepts, theoretical traditions and debates around development and humanitarian aid, focusing on the relationships between aid, politics, and violence. It looks at the political and military impacts of aid, the linkage between humanitarian aid and conflict resolution, and aid's contribution to perpetuating subtle forms of domination. (Cross-listed by the Africana Studies and the Human Rights Programs.)

Go to CU Directory of Classes


Teachers College

Fall 2015: Human Rights in Africa

ITSF 4160
Section: 
001
Call Number: 
CRN 31445
Points: 
3
Location: 
HM 438
Day/Time: 
T 05:10 pm-06:50 pm
Instructor: 
S Russell; N Moland

Students examine the historical conditions that give rise to human rights violations and the efforts to protect rights through policy and education. They explore different approaches to human rights education, apply them to case studies of specific African countries, and develop human rights education curricula.

Instructor's approval required.


Featured Courses