Institute of African Studies - Columbia University

Courses

History Courses

Summer 2018: Africa and Francehttp://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
19956
Points: 
4
Location: 
311 Fayerweather
Day/Time: 
MW 1:00 PM - 4:10 PM
Instructor: 
Gregory Mann

This course endeavors to understand the development of the peculiar and historically conflictual relationship that exists between France, the nation-states that are its former African colonies, and other contemporary African states. It covers the period from the 19th century colonial expansion through the current 'memory wars' in French politics and debates over migration and colonial history in Africa. Historical episodes include French participation in and eventual withdrawal from the Atlantic Slave Trade, emancipation in the French possessions, colonial conquest, African participation in the world wars, the wars of decolonization, and French-African relations in the contexts of immigration and the construction of the European Union. Readings will be drawn extensively from primary accounts by African and French intellectuals, dissidents, and colonial administrators. However, the course offers neither a collective biography of the compelling intellectuals who have emerged from this relationship nor a survey of French-African literary or cultural production nor a course in international relations. Indeed, the course avoids the common emphasis in francophone studies on literary production and the experiences of elites and the common focus of international relations on states and bureaucrats. The focus throughout the course is on the historical development of fields of political possibility and the emphasis is on sub-Saharan Africa. Partially fulfills Global Core Requirement.

Summer 2018: Archives of Colonialismhttp://www.columbia.edu/cu/bulletin/uwb/

Section: 
001
Call Number: 
22752
Points: 
4
Location: 
301M Fayerweather
Day/Time: 
MW 1:00pm-4:10pm
Instructor: 
Marwa Elshakry

This seminar will introduce students to a critical reflection on the nature of archives and their historical formation - as well as to their past and present disciplinary uses in history - in order help reconsider and widen their perspective on what constitutes an "archive." Focusing on the archives of colonialism in particular, it will also aim to provide students with a basic introduction to a number of key themes in the history of colonialization and decolonization rather than attempt to provide a synthetic or comprehensive history of colonialism as such. We will therefore focus on a few critical historical themes and places, covering such topics as militarization, commerce and accountancy, slavery and labor, and the role of the body, affect and language in the colonies, and ranging from Ireland and South America to Asia and Africa. Students will also be expected to work on a primary research paper of their own in which they draw on the different types of archival sources that the course will introduce them to.


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